Teen arrested after chase

April 14, 1995|By Gregory P. Kane | Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer

Anne Arundel County police were searching yesterday for a man accused of burglary who escaped after he and a teen-ager allegedly led police on a 14-mile chase through Brooklyn Park, Baltimore and Baltimore County in which one patrolman was injured, officials said.

Officer Robert Edmondson was treated at North Arundel Hospital for neck and spinal injuries Wednesday morning and released.

The incident began around 4:45 a.m. Wednesday when officers responding to an alarm at Cycle World in the 5800 block of Ritchie Highway saw a man pushing a dirt bike up the street. Officers Edmondson and David Frendlich ordered the man to stop, but the man ran to a green 1993 Ford Ranger waiting nearby, police said.

Police said the man and the teen drove south on Ritchie Highway and stopped at 11th Avenue Northwest and Ritchie Highway, where the vehicle backed up and rammed Officer Edmondson's car. They then headed north into Baltimore, east on Patapsco Avenue and north on Third Street, where the vehicle rammed Officer William Bertram's car.

Police followed the vehicle back onto Patapsco Avenue, then into West Baltimore. The man and the teen jumped out of the vehicle in the 200 block of Mount Desales Road near Coleraine Road in Baltimore County, police said.

Both jumped a fence at the Frederick Villa Nursing Home in the 700 block of Academy Road. Police apprehended a 17-year-old Baltimore County youth hiding in some nearby bushes. He was treated at North Arundel Hospital for a cut above his eye, police said.

He was charged as a juvenile with theft, burglary, assault with intent to avoid apprehension, reckless driving and fleeing and eluding, police said. He was turned over to juvenile services officials.

Police said the youth gave them the name and address of a 20-year-old Baltimore man. Officers went to the man's address but did not find him, police said.

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