Stylist says personality shapes cuts

April 09, 1995|By Ellie Baublitz | Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer

Wayne Grund likes to get inside people's heads.

He says he needs to know what's going on inside so that he can determine what needs to be done to the outside.

The 37-year-old Canadian hairstylist gave that message to beauticians at A Final Touch Beauty Salon in Eldersburg Wednesday evening, where he visited on a tour of Baltimore area salons that carry his ProDesign International hair care products.

"I need to find out who's inside your head before I touch your hair," said Mr. Grund, who is known for his stylish cuts.

"You never want to ask the customer, 'How much do you want off? Do you want to stay with the same style? What do you want?' "

Rather, Mr. Grund prefers to look at the shapes of customers' faces and learn about their lifestyles, the image they want to project, and what they like and don't like about their hair. With that kind of information, the proper haircut and style can be determined, he said.

He spent several hours at A Final Touch demonstrating his hairstyling techniques and discussing his hair care products.

He first worked on the hair of Patsy Cougnet, owner of A Final Touch. After a shampoo and protein treatment spray, she was ready for a Grund "mood" haircut.

"The Chameleon" turned out to be a soft, layered cut that could be easily changed to fit Mrs. Cougnet's mood and style -- for a long work day or a night on the town.

Mr. Grund used a razor instead of scissors to cut her hair, demonstrating how razor-cut hair falls naturally into place.

To get more body in the hair on the top of the head, cut the hair

underneath shorter, he said.

"Soft, fluid shapes are in right now," he said. "My styles are more individualized, because that's how women are today -- they're individuals."

His hairstyles also reflect the trend in women's fashion, which is toward a layered look in soft, natural textures. His haircuts complement that look.

"I see hair as a fabric, with shape, texture and color," he said. "I see what fashion is in and interpret that into the hairstyle for a complete fashion statement."

Looking at the group of beauticians, who sported a variety of hairstyles from short page boy to layered shag to all-one-length halfway down the back, Mr. Grund chose several women as models to further demonstrate his techniques.

As he worked on each woman's hair, he noted the thickness, heaviness and color of the hair while making observations on what style would complement the subject's face.

"You want to tell the client that her haircut is going to do all the work for her," he said.

A Final Touch was the last stop in a tour of area beauty salons Wednesday. Mr. Grund had met Mrs. Cougnet at a hair show in February. Impressed with her salon, which has won national awards for hair and nail care, he asked whether he could visit.

The animated Mr. Grund said he started in the hair business at 13, working for his father, a barber.

At 19, he he won the Canadian Men's Hair Cutting Championship and, a year later, the Canadian Women's Hair Cutting Championship.

For the past five years, he has been a finalist in the Canadian Hair Dresser competition.

After the early championships, he went into print work -- watching the fashion scene and doing trend releases for magazines in the industry. Then, after 14 years with Redken, he initiated his own line of hair care products.

"We're the fastest-growing hair care company in the United States with only five products on the shelves," he said. The products include shampoo, spray and treatments to rejuvenate the hair.

His goal is the change hair care by simplifying it, he said. And Mr. Grund teaches salon owners and beauticians his cutting and care methods. He said he spends about 250 days a year traveling to shows and salons in Canada and the United States.

When he's not on the road, he said, he cuts hair at his salon in

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

"I work around three points -- vision, innovation and excellence -- to keep hair care and styling simple and natural," he said.

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