Horsing aroundIf you're thinking about taking a vacation...

TRAVEL LOG

March 05, 1995|By Suzanna Stephens

Horsing around

If you're thinking about taking a vacation with your horse, the second edition of the "North American Horse Travel Guide" offers unbridled information. The 448-page guidebook provides 1,000 entries on hotels, motels, B&Bs, campgrounds, RV parks, ranches and farms predisposed to the horsy set. Also listed are stables, where to get vet care, farrier service, mechanics, fuel and food. To order, send $19.95 (plus $3.50 handling) to Roundup Press, P.O. Box 109, Boulder, Colo. 80306-0109.

Weighty matters

Gains and losses: Two-thirds of vacationers spending two to four weeks away gain an average 2 1/2 to 3 pounds, but some gain up to 9 pounds. Those results are part of a study by Maria Simonson, a psychologist at Johns Hopkins University, and her associates, published in Travel & Leisure magazine. Other findings: Only about 13 percent lose weight while on vacation, and the average loss is 6 pounds.

Irish travel news

American tourism to Ireland is riding a spectacular growth wave, said Enda Kenny, Ireland's newly appointed Minister for ,, Tourism and Trade, during a 35-city whistle-stop tour of the United States.

Since 1989, an investment of almost $1.5 billion in infrastructure has achieved dramatic results.

"Growth has been dramatic," the minister said recently at a meeting in New York.

"We have attracted over 1.2 million extra visitors -- up to 3.6 million [equal to the population of Ireland], doubled foreign revenue to over $2 billion and created 25,000 new jobs," Mr. Kenny said.

"Over the next five years, our aim is to create 35,000 new jobs. . . . The American market will be very influential -- every extra 40 or so Americans we attract will support one new job in Ireland," he said.

You can stick to this idea: maple-syrup in Vermont

New England Culinary Institute's Maple Culinary Experience weekend will explore the secrets of maple syrup -- from tree to table. The weekend is being co-sponsored by Maple Grove Farms of Vermont and the Vermont Department of Agriculture.

Participants in the March 31-April 2 event at the Inn at Essex in Essex, Vt., will tour a sugar-making operation where draft horses still pull the sap wagons and wood-fired stoves boil the liquid into syrup inside a rustic sugar house.

The weekend will also offer guests a range of meals, including a maple-theme dinner, and a choice of seven hands-on cooking classes taught by chefs from New England Culinary Institute and some of northern New England's best-known restaurants.

Also scheduled for the weekend are a maple cake demonstration by celebrity pastry chef and cookbook author Jim Dodge; two workshops, Backyard Maple Sugaring and Food Photography; a traditional sugar-on-snow party; and book signing opportunities with Mr. Dodge and with Jeffrey Paige, cookbook author and executive chef at the Creamery Restaurant at Canterbury Shaker Village in Canterbury, N.H.

All-inclusive costs for the weekend of classes, workshops and demos, two nights deluxe accommodations, a dessert reception Friday night, breakfast, lunch and dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday, are $450 per person, single occupancy, or $375 double occupancy.

For more information about the Maple Culinary Experience, write New England Culinary Institute, 250 Main St., Montpelier, Vt., 05602-9720 or call (802) 879-5471 Ext. 494.

Euro Disney has announced that admission prices to Disneyland Paris will be lowered April 1 in an attempt to attract more visitors. The high-season admission will drop from $47, calculated at 5.3 francs to the dollar, to $37. On Oct. 1, low-season rates will drop from $42.50 and $33 (depending on the date) to $28. The move was made in response to heavy losses in the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 1994. The park had 8.8 million visitors in fiscal 1994 and needs to attract an additional 700,000 this year to break even.

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