Guilford Pharmaceuticals picks staff

March 05, 1995|By Timothy J. Mullaney | Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer

Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Baltimore has recruited two scientists to head its basic and clinical research teams.

Earl Webb Henry, 47, last week was named vice president of clinical research for Guilford, which is developing drugs to treat disorders of the central nervous system.

Dr. Henry came from Sandoz Research Institute, the research arm of the Swiss drug concern. He trained in neurology and neuropathology at Harvard Medical School and served on the faculty in the Department of Neurology/Neuropathology from 1979 to 1986.

Peter D. Suzdak, 36, was named vice president of research. He was director of neurobiology at Novo Nordisk A/S, a Danish drug company. He has also served as a pharmacology research associate at the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda.

"The addition of Drs. Henry and Suzdak greatly enhances the strength of our management team and places our clinical and basic research programs in very capable hands," said Craig Smith, Guilford's president and chief executive officer. "Their knowledge, experience, and judgment will be key to Guilford's continued success."

Guilford was spun off from Scios Nova Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., which acquired Baltimore-based Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. in 1992. Guilford had its initial public offering last year, and is developing products to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases of the central nervous system.

The company's initial product candidates are intended for patients with brain cancer, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, severe epilepsy and damage from a stroke.

Many of the products had been under development for years at Nova, but did not fit into Scios Nova's plans, the company has said.

Scios retains about 30 percent of Guilford's stock, and the state of Maryland owns a small piece of the company's preferred stock purchased under a Schaefer administration initiative to provide venture capital to promising Maryland technology companies.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.