Buck-Stram plain talk remains a Super sound

ON THE AIR

January 26, 1995|By MILTON KENT

Jack Buck and Hank Stram were each struck with one inescapable conclusion as they returned to their respective homes after calling the Dallas-San Francisco NFC championship game a couple Sundays ago for CBS Radio:

Dallas was the better team.

"I flew back from San Francisco thinking the wrong team won," said Buck. "I kind of thought Dallas proved they were just as good as the 49ers."

Said Stram: "I have a chart I keep with about 74 categories, and Dallas ended up ahead on most of them. I really and truly thought that if they played again, without the turnovers, there's no question Dallas would have won."

Unlike the Cowboys, Buck and Stram -- the other Monday night football broadcast crew -- will be in Miami for Sunday's Super Bowl (WBAL 1090 AM, 5:45 p.m.), their 15th together for CBS Radio, which expects an audience of 12 million on its 375-station network.

And unlike the heaping plate of hoopla ABC will lay on the television audience, Buck and Stram will provide their audience of blind listeners, travelers, taxi drivers and those who like the game without frills with a serving of just plain football, meat and potatoes, if you will.

"It's amazing to me the people we hear from, particularly people who are blind, who tell us they enjoy our work and how much they count on us. If you can help those people, it's really rather satisfying," said Stram.

Even if they don't believe San Francisco should be in the Super Bowl, both Buck and Stram -- whose Kansas City Chiefs were heavy underdogs to the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IV -- said the 49ers should be the overwhelming favorites to win Sunday.

"I just don't think they [the San Diego Chargers] are good enough to beat San Francisco unless the 49ers have a horrible day and have some turnovers and some funny things," said Stram.

Said Buck: "I've been picking the Bills just to have someone on the AFC side. I'm tired of making a fool of myself, so I'm picking San Francisco to win, and I think the line is about right."

Clearing the air

For the record, Gail Bending, Channel 13's news director, politely wants it known that her station actually broke the word during its 6 p.m. news a couple of Fridays ago that investor Malcolm Glazer had broken in front of the pack to buy the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

So noted.

Gender equity

CBS has arranged a rather intriguing college basketball doubleheader for Saturday (1:30 p.m., Channel 13), as the Connecticut and Kansas men's and women's teams will square off in Kansas City, Mo.

In the first game, the No. 1 Connecticut women's team meets the 17th-ranked Jayhawks, and the men's contest pits the second-ranked Huskies against seventh-ranked Kansas.

Sean McDonough will do play-by-play for both games, alongside Ann Meyers in the women's contest and Billy Packer in the second game.

The announcer assignment makes one wonder if Meyers or Packer could have done both games. CBS may have thought Meyers, who will do men's tournament games before analyzing the women's Final Four, wasn't capable of calling a regular-season men's game, or, more likely, Packer thought doing a women's game was somehow beneath him.

'Dumb Moves' for $200, Alex

Taking the early lead in the "Silliest Olympic Corporate Partnership" sweepstakes is the deal between syndicator King World and Atlanta Centennial Olympic Properties that makes "Jeopardy!" and "Wheel of Fortune" the official game shows of the 1996 Summer Olympics.

"Boy, do I feel like a dope!" said Richard Pound, a Canadian-based member of the International Olympic Committee, who was in on this momentous decision.

We couldn't have said it better, Richard, except if you were really on your game (pun intended), you would have hooked the Olympic rings, flames and ideal with the only appropriate game show title that describes the IOC's money grab:

"The Price is Right."

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