Arlie G. SecristConstruction supervisorArlie Gordon...

November 27, 1994

Arlie G. Secrist

Construction supervisor

Arlie Gordon Secrist, a retired construction supervisor who had worked for a Baltimore-based company, died Monday of an aneurysm at the University of Virginia Hospital in Charlottesville, Va. He was 67.

He retired in 1988 from Haverhill Contracting Inc., of Baltimore, where he had worked for 28 years. Earlier, he had been employed in a similar capacity for Russell Elliott Construction.

Born and raised in Lahmansville, W.Va., he received his education in schools there. He joined the Army in 1948. After being discharged as a sergeant in 1951, he settled in Westminster.

After retirement, he moved to Petersburg, W.Va., where he did woodworking and gardening and was active in VFW Post 6454 in Petersburg.

In 1952, he and the former Mary Dayton were married. She died in 1977.

Services are planned for 2 p.m. tomorrow at Lahmansville United Methodist Church.

Survivors include a daughter, Connie Robin Secrist of Martinsburg, W.Va.; two brothers, James Secrist of Lahmansville, and Wayne Secrist of Leesburg, Va.; two sisters, Josephine Keplinger and Kathleen Mowry, both of Petersburg, W.Va., and his companion, Martha Jane Simon.

Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, P. O. Box 43025, Baltimore 21236-0025.

Elizabeth F. Cioni

Cared for sick animals

Elizabeth Ford Cioni, a secretary at the University of Maryland who opened her Towson home to sick and injured animals at all hours of the day and night, died Thursday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 53.

"She was a truly wonderful person -- so kind and caring," said Valerie Shaffer, director of the Association For Animal Rights in Baltimore. "We always knew that if we had an animal in need of tender, loving care, we could call Elizabeth any time, and she would nurse it back to health until we found a home for it."

Even as Ms. Cioni's own illness began to overcome her, she took in a sickly cat named Onyx and nurtured it until her death, Ms. Shaffer said.

"She was always that way, just loved animals, ever since she was a little girl and her aunt gave her a cat named Dagwood," said Ms. Cioni's mother, Nancy Ford, 78, of Lakeland, Fla. "That cat lived for 21 years. I guess that tells you something."

Ms. Cioni, who grew up in Lakeland, came to Baltimore as a young woman to visit relatives when she was a University of North Carolina student and never left.

She took a job as a secretary at Johns Hopkins University and later went to work for the University of Maryland.

She and her former husband, Philip T. Cioni, were divorced.

Ms. Cioni was a member of the Central Presbyterian Church in Towson and the Association For Animal Rights.

At her death last week, she had a dog and three cats.

In addition to her mother, Ms. Cioni is survived by a son, Todd Cioni of Baltimore.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at First United Methodist Church in Lakeland.

Memorial contributions may be made to the American Diabetes Association, 2 Reservoir Circle, Baltimore 21208, or the Western Maryland College Communications Department, c/o Jane DeGroot, 2 College Hill, Westminster 21157.

Irene A. Heise

Centenarian

Irene A. Heise, a centenarian and resident of Halethorpe, died Thursday of heart failure at Meridian Nursing Center on Hammonds Lane. She was 104.

Miss Heise grew up on Patterson Park Avenue in Baltimore. She attended St. Andrew's Elementary School and was a member of St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Church on Monument Street.

She went to work when she was 14 at Hochschild-Kohn department store in Baltimore.

"She used to polish the silver at the store," said her niece, Dorothy Miller of Halethorpe. Miss Heise's mother was not impressed with her daughter's job, but Miss Heise thought it was wonderful, Mrs. Miller said.

"She remembered the Great Baltimore Fire and used to talk about riding in a horse and carriage," Mrs. Miller said.

For many years, Miss Heise worked as a bookkeeper for William Deiches and Co., a cigar wholesaler on South Hanover Street.

In her later years, she helped take care of her parents and her two sisters, Lillie Heise and Mabel Heise Christian, both of whom have died.

Miss Heise moved to Halethorpe in 1925 and stayed there until 1989 when illness forced her to move to the nursing center.

Mrs. Miller said her aunt was an avid gardener and a meticulous housekeeper. "Her home was very important to her. She used to spit and polish everything."

A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Church of the Ascension in Halethorpe.

Miss Heise is survived by two other nieces, Ruth DeBoy and Claire Miller, both of Catonsville; and a nephew, Thomas W. Christian of Woodbine.

Gladys Taylor

Seamstress

Gladys Taylor, a South Baltimore resident who worked as a seamstress, died Thursday of a heart ailment at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 72.

Services were to be held at noon tomorrow at Good Tidings Baptist Church, 1401 Edison Highway. Interment was to be in Garrison Forest Veteran Cemetery.

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