Keeping a happy hunting marriage

OUTDOORS

October 23, 1994|By LONNY WEAVER

Finksburg's Susan Brower has been married to an avid outdoorsman for two decades, and their 17-year-old son is "a very avid deer hunter."

Brower describes herself as a "hunter's widow."

"Possessing a sense of humor is essential for all good marriages," she said, "and I truly believe it is a must for a wife of an outdoorsman. For example, you can probably imagine the reaction I got the first time I decided to wash my husband's new hunting pants in Downy fabric softener!"

About a year ago, Brower created something that she had been seeking for many years -- a publication devoted to the partners of outdoorsmen offering helpful tips on how to save relationships, prepare delicious game and fish dinners, cope with spoiled and soiled hunting dogs, and share experiences.

"For these reasons I created 'The Hunter's Widow,' and the reception it has received has been overwhelming positive," Brower said.

"I am discovering, for example, that there are many wonderful wild game cookbooks out there, and in the library section of my publication we provide the information necessary to purchase them. Something as seemingly simple as this wasn't available to me as the young wife of an avid hunter and fisherman."

Some of the topics found in the current 20-page issue include: "Secrets to Cooking Venison," a review of the largest wild game restaurant on the East Coast and located a short drive from Carroll County, "How to Rate a Butcher" and "Survival Tips for Relationships." There are also lots of shared experiences from readers and loads of recipes.

In the next issue, which is due out in April, a subscriber will be selected by drawing to receive a lap quilt. A one-year subscription costs $5. An additional $1 will make you eligible for the quilt drawing. To subscribe, sent a check or money order to "The Hunter's Widow," P.O. Box 209, Finksburg, Md. 21048.

Local fishing is great

Angling has been great at Liberty, Piney Run and the upper Potomac River throughout the week.

Liberty anglers have enjoyed excellent results on striped bass using chicken livers and shiners during the early morning hours. These are big fish -- 10- and 12-pounders are not uncommon.

Largemouth bass are the big attraction at Piney Run Reservoir with superb yellow perching and crappie action. Use plastic worms and rapalas on the bass, night crawlers on the perch and minnows on shad darts for the crappie. Potomac smallmouths are hitting minnows and crayfish, with some bass going 2 1/2 pounds.

Also, trout fishing has really picked up thanks to a restocking by the Department of Natural Resources. Piney Run Reservoir recently got 1,000 trout, Taneytown Rod & Gun's pond received 500 and the Patapsco River along Route 32 got 1,000. Morgan Run, which is a catch-and-release area only, was stocked with 500.

Hunting news

The early dove season closed yesterday, but will reopen for a short, and often sweet, hunt Nov. 21-25.

Last weekend I hunted all day and had a ball limiting out on squirrels in the morning and doves in the afternoon. The squirrel season continues through January.

Bow-hunting deer hunters have done well during this early part of the season. The early muzzleloader rifle deer season concluded yesterday, and indications are that it was a success.

Woodcock have been spotted at the Hanover Watershed this week. The season opens tomorrow and continues through Nov. 25, breaks for the deer season and then picks up Dec. 12-23. The best local hunting is found at the Hanover site.

Look for a good ruffed grouse season, too, but there's little grouse hunting in Carroll, except for a small pocket near the Frederick County line. There is good hunting, though, in the Thurmont area and the Frederick Watershed.

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