A Fight for Maryland's Future The Candidates Speak Out

October 21, 1994|By PARRIS N. GLENDENING

In this campaign, Marylanders are facing a critical decision that will affect our lives in real ways. Will we be able to afford a college education for our children? Will the public schools prepare them for the work place of the 21st century? Will they have a variety of challenging and good-paying jobs available to them? Will we finally do something about streets that are filled with too many guns and too few police officers? Will we continue to work toward restoring our beloved Chesapeake Bay? Those are the stakes in this election, and the questions that our next governor will face. It is a fight for Maryland's future.

Throughout my career -- as a teacher, a local school volunteer and as Prince George's County executive -- I have fought for the things that are important to Marylanders: education, safe streets, good jobs and environmental protection. In this campaign, I am fighting for working families throughout Maryland. I am fighting for reasonable, common-sense plans and proposals that will cut government, hold the line on taxes and change our priorities so we can invest in the things that are good for Maryland -- like improving education, keeping our communities safe and healthy, creating new job opportunities and balancing a strong economy with a thriving environment.

I bring to this fight my experience as the chief executive of a county larger than six states. I have effectively managed billion-dollar budgets, cut spending and decreased the size of government. I guided the county through tough economic times, and I am happy to report that we have emerged with a $38 million surplus and the highest bond ratings available to us. That is the experience I will bring to Annapolis. My opponent has never managed anything more than a two-person staff.

Throughout her 16-year career, my Republican opponent, Ellen Sauerbrey, has fought against the things we Marylanders believe in. Her budget proposal for the 1993 fiscal year cut $88.2 million out of law enforcement, and she consistently sided against Maryland's police officers by opposing reasonable measures to control handguns and ban military-style assault weapons.

She has voted time and time again against a woman's right to choose, and even opposed legislation to outlaw the use of violence and intimidation to blockade women's health clinics. She proposed taking millions of dollars out of A record of executive experience and leadership.

public schools to pay for private-school vouchers. She consistently sides with big corporate polluters and special interests against the environment. In fact, she had the worst environmental record in the entire House of Delegates, according to the non-partisan League of Conservation Voters.

On taxes, she is playing the oldest political game in the book -- saying anything to get elected. After doing nothing for 16 years in Annapolis, just weeks before the primary she came up with a political gimmick. She has promised $2 billion in lost revenues and another $1 billion in new spending.

The Sauerbrey plan is a recipe for fiscal disaster that will destroy our AAA bond rating. She refuses to say how she would pay for these pie-in-the-sky promises, because she knows what they really mean: Her plan means cuts in education that will increase class size, deprive schools of the ability to buy new text books or expand the use of technology, and raise tuition at state colleges. It means cuts in law enforcement that will leave us with fewer police officers on the street. It means cuts in programs to provide senior citizens with health care. nutrition and other assistance. And it means a massive tax shift that will send local property taxes through the roof.

When a similar scheme was tried in New Jersey, average families in 85 percent of communities surveyed were paying more in increased property taxes then they saved in income taxes. The pension fund was robbed, and the state is facing a major budget shortfall. Maryland does not need to follow the New Jersey example of raiding state pension funds, hiking property taxes and risking fiscal disaster.

I have introduced a comprehensive plan to meet these challenges as governor, and I have a record of executive leadership, bringing people together to make progress for our families and our communities. My plan is imbued with the values of mainstream Marylanders who want to move our state forward into the next century in prosperity and safety, with top-quality schools for our children and a bounty of environmental riches preserved for future generations.

Maryland is a place where we care about families, where we care about the well-being of our children, where we care for the elderly and where we care about the environment. Those are Maryland values, and I will fight for them every day when I am governor.

G; Parris Glendening is Democratic candidate for governor.

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