'My So-Called Life' has a new show

TODAY'S TV

October 20, 1994|By David Bianculli | David Bianculli,Special to The Sun

ABC brings back "My So-Called Life" tonight, while Connie Chung returns with a so-called scoop.

* "My So-Called Life." (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Pre-empted last week by a two-hour "Matlock," "My So-Called Life" tonight presents a new episode, which is reason enough to tune in. ABC.

* "Seinfeld." (9 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- From two years ago, "Seinfeld" repeats an episode featuring Jessica Lundy and her memorable funny laugh. NBC repeat.

* "Chicago Hope." (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- This episode includes a gun-wielding maniac in the emergency room -- which, given how this show has been eclipsed by NBC's "E.R.," might be a case of wishful thinking on the part of the producers. CBS.

* "E.R." (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Why isn't John Kelly's ex-wife providing support for him on "NYPD Blue"? Because the actress who plays her, Sherry Stringfield, is alive and well and very busy here on "E.R.," thank you. NBC.

* "Eye to Eye With Connie Chung." (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- With no Tonya Harding to chase around any more, Ms. Chung now gets Faye Resnick, whose new book on Nicole Simpson has raised such a fuss. CBS.

Cable

* "Biography: Cary Grant." (8 p.m.-9 p.m., A&E) -- Grant's motto was "never complain, never explain." He pretty much stuck to that his whole life -- a life examined in tonight's installment of "Biography."

* "Voyage." (9 p.m.-11 p.m., USA) -- There's been an excellent movie made about a couple whose idyllicsailboat voyage is interrupted and threatened by deadly visitors, but this isn't it. This one was a USA Network made-for-TV movie starring Rutger Hauer and Karen Allen. The one to rent on video is "Dead Calm," the 1989 thriller starring Nicole Kidman, Sam Neill and Billy Zane.

* "Bang the Drum Slowly." (11 p.m.-12:45 a.m., AMC) -- Paul Newman starred in the original 1956 "U.S. Steel Hour" live version of this baseball drama, which co-starred George Peppard. Seventeen years later, writer Mark Harris adapted his teleplay for the movies, with Robert De Niro and Michael Moriarty. That's the version shown here, and it's well worth watching.

* "Stephen King's 'Sometimes They Come Back.' " (1:10 a.m.-2:40 a.m., MAX) -- King was right. This is a repeat.

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