Heritage File: history on a cardThe pretty little box...

ON THE HOME FRONT

October 02, 1994|By Elizabeth Large

Heritage File: history on a card

The pretty little box covered in Florentine paper holds a lot of history. It's called the Heritage File, and it contains 200 cards and dividers on which you can record the background of family heirlooms and gifts. Each card has spaces for classification, description, value, source of information and other categories of the item. For instance, a relish tray inherited from your aunt might have "Depression glass" as the classification, "Miss America pattern" as the description, and so on.

The Heritage File is sold at the Carriage House in Cockeysville and area museums such as the Maryland Historical Society. You can also buy it by mail for $21 through Heirlooms for You, Dept. C, P. O. Box 9014, Lutherville, Md. 21094-9014.

Furniture store opens up

You may have noticed that AslanFurniture in Lutherville is now Royal Furniture. That's because its parent company, Royal Furniture downtown, no longer sells just to the trade. The Lutherville store is now effectively a branch of Royal. Before the downtown store went public, you had to be an interior designer, or be accompanied by one, if you wanted to shop at the showrooms at 510 S. Monroe St.

Now anyone can stop by the downtown store Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Monday and Thursday to 9 p.m.), and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. There's a private lot for parking.

Home sweet home

A Guilford home is the inspiration for an essay in the October issue of House Beautiful. Look for "What I Knew at Eight" by Spencer Harris Morfit, this month's "Thoughts of Home" column.

Suited to a tea

Tea, anyone? Portebello Square at 28A W. Allegheny Ave. in Towson has all sorts of tea items on display.

The antique shop recently bought a collection of 54 English, American and German teapots dating from the late 1800s to the 1940s. The owners of the shop have arranged them with antique porcelain tea strainers (33 of them), a charcoal burning Russian samovar (circa 1790), an English tea caddy of fruit wood inlaid with satinwood, a Russian tea caddy, a porcelain tea set from Paris and their huge collection of individual teacups.

Afternoon tea is supposed to be the next hot trend after espresso; here's all the equipment you'll ever need!

On the Home Front welcomes interesting tidbits of home and garden news. Please send suggestions to Elizabeth Large, On the Home Front, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.

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