Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol...

VOTES IN CONGRESS

August 28, 1994|By Roll Call Report Syndicate

Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:

Y: YES N: NO X: NOT VOTING

HOUSE: CRIME BILL

By a vote of 235-195, the House approved legislation (HR 3355) to spend $30.2 billion over six years on crime prevention and punishment. Major outlays are $5.5 billion for social programs to steer youth away from crime, $1.4 billion to combat drug abuse, $13.5 billion for hiring local police and border patrol agents and $9.7 billion for building prison cells. About two-thirds of the cost would be paid through a trust fund financed by cuts in the federal work force in the next few years. Remaining costs will be added to the national debt unless Congress finds a means of offsetting them.

The bill outlaws 19 types of semi-automatic assault weapons and expands the number of federal offenses subject to the death penalty from two to 60. In addition to addressing the 5 percent of crimes that are federal, it uses the leverage of Treasury money to bring about tougher state and local treatment of people who commit nonfederal crimes.

A yes vote was to send the 1994 crime bill conference report to the Senate.

Y N X Member

* N * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: ALTERNATIVE CRIME BILL

By a vote of 197 for and 232 against, the House defeated an 11th hour bid by conservatives to head off passage of HR 3355 (above). Their measure sought to strip the 1994 crime bill of most of its spending for social and anti-drug programs as well as its outlawing of 19 types of semi-automatic weapons.

A yes vote supported the alternative.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

* N * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

SENATE: CRIME BILL

By a vote of 61-38, the Senate approved the conference report on the 1994 crime bill (HR 3355), sending the $30.2 billion measure to President Clinton for his signature. In part, the bill pays for hiring tens of thousands of local police; requires life behind bars for people convicted of their third violent or drug-related crime, if the third conviction results from a federal crime; enables 13- and 14-year-olds to be tried as adults in certain circumstances, and funds programs to reduce violence against women. It also funds social welfare and anti-drug programs to prevent criminality.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Y N X Member

Y * * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: PROCEDURAL HURDLE

By a vote of 61-39, the Senate achieved the three-fifths majority it needed to clear a procedural hurdle placed by Republicans in the path of the 1994 crime bill conference report (HR 3355). The vote overcame a GOP challenge to the legitimacy of an off-budget trust fund established by the bill to pay much of the bill's $30.2 billion cost out of savings from civil service job cuts.

A yes vote was to move to final approval of the crime bill.

Y N X Member

Y * * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

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