Judge makes a Memorial retirement

July 29, 1994|By SYLVIA BADGER

Usually when a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge retires, proceeds from the retirement dinner are used to buy the retiree a gift. Not so with Judge Leonard S. Jacobson, who asked the Baltimore County Bar Association to donate proceeds from his dinner to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

Judge and Mrs. Jacobson, charter members, have sponsored several trips to the museum for members of the bench and bar of Baltimore County. Their third excursion is scheduled for Sept. 18 and they expect more than 90 members of the bar and their families to go with them to Washington.

Jay Schlossberg-Cohen, the effervescent former director of the Maryland Film Commission, brings to his paintings the same enthusiasm he brought to the commission. Since he left the state in 1993 to devote all of that energy to his artwork, he's landed some pretty nice commissions. Among his creations are a Preakness poster, the original hangs at Baltimore-Washington International airport; cityscapes of Good Samaritan Hospital; a commemorative for Peabody Prep's 100th anniversary; and, next week, he'll unveil his latest, depicting the beauty of Rocky Gap State Park.

The Rocky Gap Foundation president, Cas Taylor, who is also speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates, asked Schlossberg-Cohen to paint a limited edition print for the 1994 Rocky Gap Country Bluegrass Festival. Both original and prints will be unveiled Thursday night in Western Maryland at the Arts Alive! reception held before the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Emmylou Harris performance. For tickets to the reception, call Susan Lowcock Harris at (301) 689-7292.

Anthony Marshall, a lifelong conservationist and member of the board of the New York Zoological Society, has written the first and only guide to U.S. zoos. "ZOO," a must for animal lovers who travel, evaluates 102 zoos, aquariums and wildlife parks. But here's the best part -- he rates the National Aquarium in Baltimore as the best aquarium in the country. His observations, and there are many, include words like "overwhelming" when talking about the reef exhibit to praise when discussing the abilities of aquarium director Nick Brown.

The Baltimore Zoo is mentioned, but not in glowing terms. He feels the Children's Zoo is the zoo's best feature.

Seems hard to believe that it's been 14 years since the Brass Elephant restaurant opened its doors. It was 1980, the year the U.S. Olympic team beat the Soviets, Reagan became president and "Happy Days" and "The Love Boat" were top attractions on TV.

As an anniversary present to its customers, the Brass Elephant has rolled back its menu prices to 1980 levels.

The promotion lasts until Labor Day, making August the month to "do" lunch or dinner with all those people who've taken you out at 1994 prices.

Some 100 Loew's theaters will air 60-second public service announcements on domestic violence during August. They're doing this in conjunction with the House of Ruth and its fund-raiser Sept. 8., which stars Maureen "There has to be a morning after" McGovern in concert at Pier Six. Call (410) 554-8446 for tickets.

Four Baltimore restaurants will be featured in an August segment of a national cable network, Television Food Network. Don't grab your TV book, because we don't get the station in our area. However, owners of Linwood's, Pierpoint, Phillips and John Steven were thrilled to be featured because of potential tourist business.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.