John A. EllinghausRetired machinistJohn A. Ellinghaus, a...

July 23, 1994

John A. Ellinghaus

Retired machinist

John A. Ellinghaus, a retired machinist who was active in church work, died Wednesday of cancer at the Highlandtown home in which he was born. He was 74.

He retired in 1982 after 41 years as a machinist at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant.

He was a graduate of Sacred Heart of Jesus School and the Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he was a machinist's mate in the Navy.

He was a former Commander of Post 821 of the Catholic War Veterans, moderator of the National Adoration Society and a member of the Baltimore Urban League.

At Sacred Heart of Jesus Roman Catholic Church in Highlandtown, he was a member of the Parish Council, an extraordinary minister of the Eucharist and a lector. He was a charter member of the church's Home School Committee, an adviser to the Catholic Youth Organization, director of the parish bingo, chairman of the ride committee of the parish carnival and a member of the drama club and choir.

A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. today at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, 600 S. Conkling St.

He is survived by his wife, the former Helen M. Reinsfelder; two sons, John F. Ellinghaus of Elkton and Lawrence G. Ellinghaus of Glen Arm; three daughters, Helena K. Scher of Millersville, Maryanna C. Warfield of Baltimore and Carroll County District Judge JoAnn Ellinghaus-Jones of Westminster; two sisters, Mary Struzinski of Baltimore and Sister Mary Dorinda Ellinghaus, S.S.N.D., of Towson; and 10 grandchildren.

Jane Haney Schick

Active church member

Jane A. Haney Schick, a homemaker and churchwoman, died of cancer at her Hampton home on Wednesday, the day before her 74th birthday.

She was active in the affairs of the Towson United Methodist Church where she was a member of the Brass Handbell Choir and was recently awarded a life member pin from the Women's Society at the church.

She was an avid duckpin bowler and a member of the Hampton Maids, a bowling team in the Hampton Mixed League. She also had been a member of the Hampton Garden Club and the Women's Club of Towson.

She was born and reared in New Philadelphia, Ohio, where she was a graduate of local schools.

In 1941, she married Howard E. Schick, an aeronautical engineer, and moved to Baltimore. He worked at the Glenn L. Martin Co.'s Middle River plant and after retiring from Martin Marietta Corp. in 1965, he established Centurion Realty Inc., a Towson real estate and appraisal firm. Mr. Schick survives her.

Services were set for 9 a.m. today at the Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Road.

Other survivors include two daughters, Judith A. Rinaldi of Towson and Janis A. Schick of Hampton; a brother, Gerald R. Haney of Sugar Creek, Ohio; and a sister, Majel M. Frail of East Liverpool, Ohio.

Memorial donations may be made to the Music Department, Towson United Methodist Church, 501 Hampton Lane, Towson 21204; or St. Joseph Hospital Hospice Fund, 7620 York Road, rTC Towson 21204.

Barbara A. Wheeler

Worked in supermarket

Barbara Ann Wheeler, who worked in the produce department in a Manchester-area supermarket, died Wednesday of cancer at her home in Westminster. She was 49.

She had worked for the Super Thrift supermarket for about two years. As a young woman, she had done secretarial work in Baltimore.

Born in Baltimore, the former Barbara Ann Gibson was a graduate of St. Thomas Aquinas School and Eastern High School.

A Mass of Christian burial was to be offered at 10 a.m. today at St. Thomas Aquinas Roman Catholic Church, Hickory Avenue at 37th Street in Baltimore.

She is survived by her husband, Mike Wheeler; a son, Joseph Wheeler of Westminster; her mother, Mary Huebschmann, and stepfather, James Huebschmann, of New Freedom, Pa.; two brothers, Norman Gibson of Baltimore and Dale Griffin of Edgewood; three sisters, Jeanne Adams of Baltimore, Beverly Elliott of Hampstead and Mary Jo Gibson of Baltimore; and several nieces and nephews.

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