Hornets said to be close to getting Bullets' Adams

July 19, 1994|By Jerry Bembry | Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer

In desperate need of a point guard to back up former Dunbar star Muggsy Bogues, the Charlotte Hornets are close to making a deal for the Washington Bullets' Michael Adams, a source said.

The Hornets, dissatisfied with Tony Bennett as their backup point guard, apparently feel that Adams' style is suited for their running offense and would keep Bogues from playing close to 40 minutes a game. Charlotte reportedly is offering a second-round pick for Adams.

Bullets general manager John Nash has confirmed the talks, which were reported in Charlotte papers over the weekend. The Bullets would enter the free-agent market in search of a point guard, and by moving Adams, the team could free up some money to move closer to signing first-round pick Juwan Howard.

Adams reportedly made $1.3 million last season, close to the $1.24 million salary opening the Hornets have. The teams apparently are discussing ways to please Adams, who is signed through next season.

Frank Catapano, Adams' agent, said he would not comment on recent talks about his client.

"I'd rather wait to see what happens and how it happens," Catapano said. "We've had discussions [with Charlotte] in the past. Before they asked if we would be willing to restructure and I said yes, and Michael concurred. We'll see if this time it can be worked out."

Adams averaged 12.1 points and a team-leading 6.9 assists last season, his third year in his second stint with the Bullets. He first played with the Bullets in the 1986-87 season, then was traded to Denver a year later after Washington drafted Bogues in the first round in 1987.

In Denver, Adams averaged a career-best 26.5 points during the 1990-91 season. When he returned to Washington for the 1991-92 season, Adams averaged 18.1 points and was named to the All-Star Game for the only time in his career.

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