Reginald H. GravesLever Brothers employeeReginald H...

July 08, 1994

Reginald H. Graves

Lever Brothers employee

Reginald H. Graves, an assembly line worker who did woodworking in his leisure time, died Sunday of respiratory failure at his West Baltimore residence. He was 54.

He had been employed for 31 years at the Holabird Avenue plant of Lever Bros.

"He loved woodworking and built fences as well as a bedroom set for his daughter and had quite a shop in his garage," said a sister, Eloise Graves-Gross of Baltimore.

He also enjoyed playing basketball, drawing cartoons and working in his yard.

"His neighbors will remember him most for the way he maintained his neatly manicured lawn and shrubbery at his Groveland Avenue residence before he became ill," said Mrs. Graves-Gross said.

Mr. Graves, a native of Roxboro, N.C., moved to Turners Station in his youth and was a 1960 graduate of Sollers Point High School. He served with an Army combat division in Germany and was discharged with the rank of specialist 4 in 1966.

He was a member of the Nomads Van Club, an organization of van owners that visited state parks throughout the country. He was known in the club by his CB radio handle, Crazy Legs.

Services were planned for 6:30 p.m. today at the March Funeral Home, 4300 Wabash Ave., Baltimore.

His marriage ended in divorce.

Other survivors include his mother, Martha Graves; three sons, Antonio Andrews, Craig Graves and Reginald Graves III; two brothers, Loy Graves and Charles Austin Graves Jr., all of Baltimore; two other sisters, Santor Graves-Hill of Baltimore and Esther Corine Graves Franklin of Roxboro; special friends Roslyn Holley, Trina Andrews and Jessica Holley, all of Baltimore; and two grandsons.

Ruth J. Shannon, a retired office worker who was known for kindheartedness, died Sunday of a heart attack at her Waverly home. She was 72.

She worked for the Sharp-Leadenhall Planning Committee in South Baltimore from 1964 until 1984.

"She was well-known in her neighborhood and always tried to give an encouraging word to those she came across," said a niece, Sandra Houston of Baltimore.

"She made sure that a lady who needed a fan and couldn't afford to buy it got one. She didn't expect or want praise -- if she saw a person in need, she'd go ahead and do what she could to help them," the niece said.

Mrs. Shannon was born Ruth Smallwood in East Baltimore and graduated from Dunbar High School.

She became a cook in her family's lunchroom at York and Charles streets. After the restaurant closed in 1950, she worked as a domestic in Guilford before going to work for the neighborhood group.

She enjoyed Bible study, reading and writing poetry and singing. She sang in the choir of Shepherd's Heart Missionary Baptist Church, where she was a charter member.

Her husband, George Shannon, a house painter whom she married in 1968, died in 1992.

Services were planned for 7:30 p.m. today at First Apostolic Faith Church, 25 S. Caroline St., Baltimore, where she was a deaconess.

Michael A. Kormuth

Court division director

Michael A. Kormuth, retired director of the Support and Custody Division of the Baltimore County Circuit Court and a conservationist, died Saturday of lung cancer at his farm in Jefferson, Pa. He was 74.

He retired in 1991 after 20 years in the court system and returned to Jefferson, his boyhood home. On the farm, he raised sheep, as he had done for many years on a farm in Monkton.

He attended schools in Jefferson and, after serving in the European Theater with the Army during World War II, continued his education at the Johns Hopkins University, earning a bachelor's degree in 1952.

Services are private.

Survivors include five sisters, Rosetta DeVito of Baltimore, Irma Timlin of Columbia, Josephine Recupero of Clarks Summit, Pa., Julia Yodens of Clarksville, Pa., and Constance Dorsey of Glenshaw, Pa.; a stepson David Beaudouin of Baltimore; and a stepgrandson.

Memorial donations may be made to the Nature Conservancy, 1815 Lynn Street, Arlington, Va. 22209.

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