Movie-ad art has its own awards ceremonies

July 03, 1994|By David Kipen | David Kipen,Los Angeles Daily News

If you thought there weren't any more awards left for "Schindler's List" to win, think again. Steven Spielberg's epic collected a record seven prizes recently in the Hollywood Reporter's 23rd Annual Key Art Awards.

What's key art, you ask? Any advertising art keyed to the release of a movie, such as trailers, posters, print ads, billboards and standees.

And what, while we've got the dictionary open, is a standee? No, not something you stand on, although many theater managers would certainly, vigorously like to. A standee is one of those free-standing cardboard displays in a theater lobby or video store. and, yes, they give awards for them. This year's went to "Addams Family Values" for its charming likeness of Thing gently rocking a black-shrouded baby carriage.

Bill Gold won this year's Key Art Lifetime Achievement Award for a poster-designing career that started in 1941 with "Yankee Doodle Dandy" and to date includes "Casablanca," "My Fair Lady," "A Clockwork Orange," the notorious legs-akimbo ad from "For Your Eyes Only" and "Unforgiven." Clint Eastwood, for whose films Mr. Gold has created 29 poster campaigns, presented the award.

So look over the print ads in today's paper, and see if you can handicap next year's Key Art Awards. Smart money? Don't bet (( against "The Shadow."

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