Soccer is at center of TV universe today

TODAY'S TV

June 18, 1994|By David Bianculli | David Bianculli,Special to The Sun

If you like soccer, this is the day for you. If not, this is the day for them.

* "Tremors."(noon-2 p.m., USA) -- This 1990 thriller comedy has just the right tone: Its laughs are funny, its scares are scary, and you're never tempted to laugh or get tense in the wrong places.

Fred Ward and Kevin Bacon star, and "Tremors" is an admirable representative of the giant-subterranean-worm genre -- better than "Dune," almost as funny as "Beetlejuice," and almost as weird as "Lair of the White Worm."

* "The Real World Marathon." (1-8 p.m., MTV) -- Seven hours of watching self-absorbed and attractive young adults work on their socialization skills.

In large doses, "The Real World" is less interesting than the real world.

* "World Cup Soccer: Italy vs. Ireland." (3:55 p.m.-conclusion, ESPN) -- This game is a rematch of sorts: Italy beat Ireland in the 1990 quarterfinals, knocking Ireland out of its best shot ever at a World Cup. Italy, on the other hand, has three championships under its belt, most recently in 1982.

* "Guinevere." (4-6 p.m., LIF) -- Sheryl Lee stars in the title role, with Sean Patrick Flanery of "Young Indiana Jones Chronicles" as her King Arthur, in this 1994 television movie that was all but buried by Lifetime when first released last month. Having seen it, I understand why.

Ms. Lee, who has made a lot of good career moves since hitting it big as Laura Palmer on "Twin Peaks," made a bad one here.

* "World Cup Soccer: Colombia vs. Romania." (7:25 p.m.-conclusion, ESPN) -- Neither of these teams has ever made it past the second round.

* "Rising Sun." (8-10:10 p.m., HBO) -- Sean Connery and Wesley Snipes come on good and strong in this 1993 Michael Crichton thriller, which looks great, moves fast, but serves up its fair share of outmoded Japanese stereotypes.

The side plots about video technology, though, are right on the money.

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