Team Weapon, Harford Lanes No. 1 win

BOWLING

June 12, 1994|By DON VITEK

In the five-member team handicap and scratch events, Team Weapon captured first place with total pin fall of 3,421, and Harford Lanes No. 1 received first-place scratch money with 3,406 at the Cecil-Harford Counties Bowling Association 36th annual championship tournament at Fair Lanes Edgewood.

Scott Poe and Kirk Janney won the handicap doubles (1,432 plus 66). Buddy Wilson and Mike Dawson teamed for the doubles scratch victory (1,454).

Bon Phillabaum fired a 745 and added 36 handicap pins for the singles handicap crown. His 745 stood up for the scratch singles, too.

George Hartwig, all-events handicap winner, rolled 1,854 and added 306 handicap pins.

Roy Harris posted a nine-game total of 2,146 (238 average) to win the all-events scratch.

Brian Sumlin fired his second 300 game of the season (his third perfect game) for the only 300 thrown in the tournament.

Sumlin, bowling for "about 20 years," lives in Darlington and said, "I'm a twice-a-week bowler, and I don't practice much."

One of the leagues is on Monday nights at Harford Lanes. The other is the Thursday Major Men's at Edgewood.

After posting the 300 game, Sumlin tacked on a 259 and 225 for a career-high set of 784.

"I had the 800 set in my pocket," the right-hander said. "Until I missed the 9-pin in the sixth frame of the second game. Even in the last game I had a chance but the 10-pin stood."

How does he do so well with so little practice?

"Bernie Smith is the reason, I guess," Sumlin said. "He got rid of a lot of wasted motion for me."

Dawson, of Aberdeen, doesn't have a 300 game to his credit, but he does have a 822 series. And he picked the right spot to throw it.

His games of 286, 268 and 268 were instrumental in achieving the scratch doubles victory with his partner.

A competitor in three Harford Lanes leagues, Monday, Thursday and Friday, Dawson used a 16-pound Ninja Fury to post the highest three-game set in the tournament.

"They had my kind of shot laid down," he said. "I could stay outside the five board and have the ball come back, even if I went out to the one-two board, it still came back, maybe even harder."

He does have two 299s and two 297s. The 300 is just a matter of time.

Wilson, of Belcamp, is in the same three leagues at Harford Lanes as his partner. He used a Turbo-X to fire his career-high set of 736 in the tournament.

"Twice I had nine [strikes] in a row in that set," he said. "I just couldn't quite get the 300."

John Kaniecki of Abingdon knows about being accurate. With a 206 average in three leagues -- Thursday at Edgewood and Monday and Wednesday at Country Club Lanes -- he saved his career high set for the tournament. First and last games were 279 around a 250 for a 808 series.

He credits Marty Letscher (of Marty's Pro Shop and a PBA member) for a lot of improvement in his game.

"Marty has worked with me, and he's the only one that I'll let drill my equipment," Kaniecki said. "My average this year is up around 212, thanks to Marty."

He could have had two 300 games in that 808 set.

"Actually, even the 250 could have been a 300," he said. "This is one time that I was really in a zone."

Harris, bowling for more than 30 years, lives in Perry Hall and restricts his league bowling to one night.

"I used to bowl a lot more," he said. "When I did bowl more often, I carried around 220. Now that's down to 213."

Winning the all-events scratch title surprised him.

"I thought Mike [Dawson] had it sewed up," Harris said. "He was bowling that good."

At Woodlawn Fair Lanes in 1991, Harris pounded out his career high series, a 838. He owns six perfect games.

Cutting back on his league bowling is not the only thing that Harris has curtailed. He's not buying a lot of new bowling balls.

"I just carry the one ball," he said. "That's it, a 15-pound Columbia Torq."

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