16 arrested in narcotics raids 14 others sought on drug charges

June 04, 1994|By Greg Tasker | Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun

FREDERICK -- Frederick narcotics officers, with FBI agents from Baltimore, arrested 16 people in raids yesterday and said they were seeking another 14 on drug charges.

Police searched homes and apartments at 17 sites in the city. Police said undercover officers had purchased crack cocaine and other drugs in those areas.

The sweep, described as one of the city's largest, followed a three-month investigation into the crack cocaine market and other illegal drug activity in the city of about 40,000, said Frederick Police Chief Regis R. Raffensberger.

Other investigations and arrests are likely to follow "Operation Drug Watch," in which arrest warrants were issued listing more than 100 state and local criminal charges linked with narcotics, including possession and manufacture and distribution of cocaine, police said.

Yesterday's raid was the second sizable drug sweep in a small Maryland city this week, although that was coincidental, police said.

State and local police arrested 14 people in Easton and St. Michaels in Talbot County on similar drug charges Monday.

Chief Raffensberger said the FBI assisted the city's Special Tactics and Operations Patrol in yesterday's raid because police sought to tackle a broad ring of drug activity.

Most of those arrested yesterday were from Frederick, but individuals from other locales were also being sought.

The raids began about 6 a.m., but by early evening, police were still not saying what they had confiscated other than crack cocaine, cash and weapons.

No unusual incidents or injuries were reported during the raids, which involved between 30 and 40 officers.

Those arrested yesterday range in age from 18 to 43, with most in their early 20s.

Fourteen of those arrested live in the Frederick area, one in Sykesville and another in Washington, D.C.

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