* Daniel Flood, was hero to many of the constituents who...

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

May 29, 1994

* Daniel Flood, was hero to many of the constituents who kept him in Congress for 32 years and emblazoned his name throughout his district. But to others, he turned out to be a crook who lived up to the image projected by his villainous-looking waxed mustache and penchant for capes. Mr. Flood died yesterday at a Wilkes-Barre, Pa., hospital. He was 90, and his body was racked by pneumonia, a stroke, a bloodstream infection and kidney failure, said Dr. Vincent Drapiewski. Known as "Dapper Dan" for his debonair clothes, Mr. Flood ended his 32 years in Congress in disgrace in 1980, pleading guilty to conspiracy after a jury was unable to reach a verdict on 13 counts of bribery, perjury and conspiracy. Prosecutors alleged the Democrat used his powerful position as chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on labor, health, education and welfare -- a position he held from 1967 to 1979 -- to line his pockets with thousands of dollars from contractors and lobbyists. Before a second trial could begin, Mr. Flood pleaded ,, guilty to one count of conspiracy. He was fined and placed on one year's probation. The original charges carried a maximum sentence of 155 years and $220,000 in fines. He returned home to Wilkes-Barre in northeastern Pennsylvania, where people remembered him more for his work on behalf of coal miners and flood victims than for his legal troubles. In Congress, Flood forced federal planners to route a major interstate highway through his district, and he was instrumental in getting an airport and a large new veterans hospital. Millions of dollars in military contracts were channeled into his district during the Vietnam War. In the last 14 years, Mr. Flood maintained a low profile, venturing out publicly only occasionally -- for a political dinner, a veterans gathering or a union meeting. Two years after his retirement, Mr. Flood spoke sadly of his new role. "I feel lost," he said. "I was so active in Washington from early in the morning until midnight or later every night. Going to so many places, and doing so many things, and then mixing with the Senate and their problems and the conference committees. Learning and hearing about the whole spectrum of legislation which is before a Congress at any given time. . . . I especially miss the members coming to see me and asking me for help."

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