Do-it-yourself first-aid books can help save a pet's life

PETS AT HOME

May 21, 1994|By Deborah Lawson | Deborah Lawson,Knight-Ridder Newspapers

How you respond to pet emergencies may mean the difference between life or death for your animal. Besides keeping the phone number of your veterinarian in a prominent place, you should consider having a pet first-aid book in the house.

Perhaps the best pet owners' first-aid manuals on the market are "The Home Pet Vet Guide: Dogs" and "The Home Pet Vet Guide: Cats" by Marvin I. Green ($7.95 plus $2 shipping and handling each in paperback; Berkshire Studio, West Stockbridge, Mass. 01260). These books contain lucid, fast-reading instructions for action in many emergencies. Very large drawings show just how to do tricky procedures and succinct first-aid copy in huge type. The books also provide excellent general health-care information.

Some general pet care books have excellent first-aid sections, especially "The Dog Care Book" and "The Cat Care Book" and "The Bird Care Book," all by Sheldon L. Gerstenfeld, V.M.D. ($14 each, plus $1.40 shiping and handling, Addison-Wesley, Jacob Way, Reading, Mass. 01867).

There is also the free pamphlet "First Aid for Dogs," available from Quaker Professional Services, "First Aid," Dept. M216, 585 Hawthorne Court, Galesburg, Ill. 61401. It covers only a smattering of emergencies you might encounter, but the information is accurate and helpful as far as it goes.

For horse owners, there is "The Horse Care Manual" ($21.95 plus $3.75 shipping and handling in soft cover; Barron's 250 Wireless Blvd., Hauppauge, N.Y. 11788). This is a widely praised book by British equine veterinarian Chris May.

A new book is "A-Z of Horse Diseases & Health Problems" by Australian veterinarian Tim Hawcroft ($19.95 plus $3.75 shipping and handling; Howell Book House, 866 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022). Deborah Lawson is the pet columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer.

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