They'd rather be fishing

May 08, 1994|By SYLVIA BADGER

For 36 years, members of the Water & Woods Fishing Club have gathered at Harrison's Chesapeake House on Tilghman Island on the last Friday in April to eat, drink and be merry, before waking at the crack of dawn Saturday for a day on the bay. The club got its start in 1958, when 30 sportsmen got together to fish the Choptank River with Capt. Buddy Harrison, and the rest is history. Today the doctors, lawyers, politicos and writers who arrive at Tilghman share one primary interest: They are all "FOBs." (Friends of Bill Burton, former outdoor editor of The Evening Sun.)

Happy hour was well on its way when I arrived at 7 p.m. and was greeted by my host, Bill, his wife, Lois, and their daughter, Heather. This was my third trip, so most of the faces were familiar.

Among them were Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who told me about a Washingtonian magazine story that dubbed her the second most powerful woman in Washington -- second only to the first lady, of course -- and United States Navy Cmdr. Rand LeBouvier, who is scheduled to take command of the USS Fort McHenry in 1995. I overheard him thanking State Comptroller Louie Goldstein for his help in getting into the Naval Academy.

Others on the fishing trip were Maryland Secretary of Natural Resources Dr. Torrey C. Brown; Joyce Williams, Department of Natural Resources; Bernie Ruck, Ruck Funeral Home; Claude Callegary, attorney; Joe Bernard and Mike Rossbach, who founded Wye River Inc., a seafood spice company; Dr. Gene Garrett; Dr. Harry MacCauley; Carey DeRussey, owner and publisher of Fishing in Maryland magazine; Paul Robertson, nursing home administrator; Johnny Marple, Johnny's Bait House, Deep Creek Lake; and Alan Doelp, who is busy working on another book.

All I can say is that six boats went out on the day before the rockfish season began, so all rockfish caught had to be immediately returned to the briny. The largest out of the five we had to return was a 48-incher that was almost as big as Heather, who reeled it in. Our day on the bay was a lot of fun, thanks in part to a most entertaining young captain, Mike Lipski.

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After living in Nashville for nine years and writing several reference books on the topic of country music, Carroll County's Bob Allen certainly knows his stuff. Allen, editor-at-large for Country Music magazine, helped write and edit "The Blackwell Guide to Recorded Country Music," and is working on "An Encyclopedia of Country Music."

But it's a book he wrote in 1984 about a country music star that prompted film producer Robert Blake to call him. Blake learned about the biography "George Jones: The Saga of an American Singer" from the Country Music Foundation in Nashville and asked Allen for an option on the book for a possible television movie. More on this later.

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Lots of excitement at the National Aquarium when David Byrne, lead singer of the rock group Talking Heads, arrived with his camera crew to shoot a scene for his new music video. The action took place in the Marine Mammal Pavilion and showed David singing his new song "Angels" with the dolphins, Nalu and Akai, leaping in the background. I hear the dolphins put on quite a show for the visiting star after the shoot.

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The Baltimore City College Glee Club is planning a reunion May 22, when Blanche F. Bowlsbey will be honored by her former glee club students. The 2 p.m. concert will be held in the school's auditorium, and tickets are $6. Call Bill Biehl, (410) 435-1387, or Tom Hinson, (410) 821-8597, for more information.

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Congratulations to:

Rose Cernak, owner of Obrycki's Crab House, who was elected to the board of Baltimore Bancorp for a three-year term. Can you believe that she's the first woman ever elected to this 13-person board? . . .

And to: Attorney-financial planner Michael Hodes, who celebrated the 10th anniversary of his talk show, "Financial Focus," recently. The show, formerly on WCBM-AM, now airs on WWLG (1360 AM), a station he owns with several partners. The topics range from franchises, mutual funds and insurance to taxes, annuities and retirement.

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