Along with new name, a new ambition: Del. DeJuliis joins fray for Bentley seat CAMPAIGN 1994

April 28, 1994|By Glenn Small | Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer

With a new name and a room full of supporters, Del. Connie Galiazzo DeJuliis, a just-married Democrat from Dundalk, last night announced she is running for Congress in the 2nd District.

The one-term delegate is running for the Democratic nomination for a seat being vacated by Republican Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, who is a gubernatorial candidate.

Stressing her blue-collar background, Mrs. DeJuliis, 47, said she would take the values she learned from her mother, an assembly line worker for Western Electric, and her father, a steelworker, to Washington.

"Some people go to Washington, and I think they think they're going to Disney World because they make a detour right straight into Fantasyland," she said. "They go to Washington, and they forget where they have come from. That's not what Connie DeJuliis is all about."

On Tuesday, she married James R. "Ron" DeJuliis, business manager of Local 37, Union of Operating Engineers. Yesterday, she embarked on the campaign trail with an appearance at North Point Gardens hall.

There are already six Democrats and two Republicans vying in a district that includes Harford County, a large part of Baltimore County and part of Anne Arundel County.

In the Democratic primary, Mrs. DeJuliis will battle Del. Gerry L. Brewster of Towson; Barbara O. Kreamer of Aberdeen, a former delegate and Harford County Councilwoman; and James Edward DeLoach Jr., Kauko Kokkonen and Joseph John Bish Jr.

On the Republican side, Del. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is running against Towson banker William J. Frank.

Mrs. DeJuliis seemed undaunted by the competition. She said she would go to Washington next year, where, "I'm going to use common sense to work for people."

A graduate of Sparrows Point High School and the University of Baltimore, Mrs. DeJuliis spoke about having been a single mother of three children, and how she worked in a factory to put herself through college.

She said she would work for better education, for safer streets and to reform health care. "I've talked with the cops on the beat, and I know that our crime bills have got to be more than a jobs program for lawyers," she said.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.