Jordan's 801 set makes history

BOWLING

April 03, 1994|By DON VITEK

Antoinette Jordan of Parkside was intent on hitting her first 300 game last month at Country Club Lanes.

"My first game was 258, then I added a 266, so I knew that I was bowling pretty good," she said. "The last game I had the first nine strikes and a big crowd in back of the lanes.

"In the 10th frame all I could think about was that three more strikes and I had the perfect game for the first time in my life, and I just put too much pressure on myself.

"I pulled the ball and left the 3-6-10 standing. When I turned around I noticed that the crowd hadn't left. They were still standing there, watching, so I made sure that I picked up the spare."

Then she finished with another strike and a career high game of 277.

And the crowd went wild. It was then that Jordan learned from information provided by the Baltimore Women's Bowling Association that she had done something never before accomplished by a woman bowler in Maryland.

That 277 game tacked onto the first two scores added up to a 801 -- the first 800 series in the state by a woman.

Confidence pays off

Mike Steinert of Dundalk has a great chance to have the top duckpin average in the Baltimore area for the 1993-94 season. And he doesn't lack confidence.

Appearing on the radio show "The Best of Bowling" last Saturday morning before he left to drive to the Washington area for a tournament, Steiner expressed that confidence.

When he asked who had a chance to win the tournament, he answered, "Hopefully, myself. I've been pretty successful down there."

Then he drove to Hyattsville and won the Fair Lanes Prince George's Duckpin Classic.

Qualifying on Saturday, with a seven-game set of 1,107, he returned on Sunday and won four of his five head-to-head matches to be top-seeded for the stepladder finals on Sunday.

In the first of those matches he defeated Ken Palmer, 175-145, then beat Buddy Creamer, 157-145. In the third match he posted 183 against Shorty Divver's 127. The fourth match was his only defeat; Richie Queen threw 141 to Steinert's 134.

"That game it seemed that all I could do was rip the middle," Steinert said. "And I still had a chance right down to the end."

Steinert came back in the last match of the semifinals and defeated Butch Pryor, 150-124.

Then he waited for three games in the finals while Kenny Brooks climbed from the fourth-seeded position to the top for the final match with Steinert for the championship.

Even with Brooks throwing a 159, the result was never in doubt.

Steinert fired an outstanding game of 195. "It could have been 200 easy," he said.

The victory was worth $1,200.

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