Robinson points way to scoring record books

March 26, 1994|By Gary Lambrecht | Gary Lambrecht,Sun Staff Writer

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- Since Glenn Robinson outdid himself again in Thursday night's semifinals, it's time to update the accomplishments of the nation's leading scorer.

Robinson's 44 points against Kansas mark the most points scored in this year's NCAA tournament, the most scored at Thompson-Boling Arena and the most by a Purdue player in the national tournament.

Robinson also became only the 15th player in college basketball history to score 1,000 points in a season. He has 1,017. He is averaging 37.1 points over his past nine games, helping the Boilermakers to an eight-game winning streak. In the NCAA tournament, Robinson is averaging 36.0 points and 9.7 rebounds.

Adjustment facts

Duke took control of Marquette in the second half after coach Mike Krzyzewski made some key adjustments. He replaced Grant Hill at the point with freshman guard Jeff Capel, and had Antonio Lang guard Marquette forward Damon Key.

"We wanted to give Grant more room to operate on the floor," Krzyzewski said. "We wanted him to catch the ball at midcourt and do more damage."

Lang, with help from Cherokee Parks, shut down Key. Capel did an excellent job running the offense. And Hill scored 16 second-half points to help the Blue Devils put away the Warriors.

Incidentally, Hill played for Purdue coach Gene Keady on the 1991 Pan American Games team that won a bronze medal.

"Grant is a lot like my players," Keady said. "Not only is he a great player, he's a great person who is easy to coach."

Miscellaneous

Purdue forward Cuonzo Martin scored a season-high 29 points in the 83-78 victory over Kansas in the semifinals, and Martin is averaging 20 points in the tournament, four more than his regular-season average. . . . Kansas coach Roy Williams on tonight's game: "If I were a fan and I didn't feel the way I do about these [Kansas] guys, I would pay the scalper's price to see that game."

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