Cabinet could be worth $1,000-$1,500

MARKET VALUE

March 13, 1994|By Anne McCollam | Anne McCollam,Copley News Service

Q: We hope you can give us an idea of the value of our oak dental cabinet in the enclosed photo. The base is green marble and the knobs are clear glass.

The original milk glass dividers are still in the small drawers and inside the top section.

We think it is around 75 years old. It has never been refinished and is in beautiful condition.

A: Dental cabinets of the type and quality of yours are frequently used today to store silver flatware. Your estimate of its vintage is accurate. Oak dental cabinets are usually in the $1,000-to-$1,500 range and can sometimes go as high as $5,000.

Q: I am curious about a glass plate that I have. It is a light-green iridescent color. There are two peacocks sitting on a fence. Below the peacocks are flowers. The edge of the plate is ruffled and the back is ribbed. It is 9 inches in diameter. On the bottom of the plate is the letter "N."

Could you please tell me if this is carnival glass and what its value might be?

A: "The Standard Encyclopedia of Carnival Glass" by Bill Edwards shows a plate like yours.

Mr. Edwards says, "Often called 'Peacocks on the Fence,' this Northwood pattern typifies what carnival glass is really all about. An interesting pattern, well molded, and turned out in a variety of appealing colors."

"Warman's Glass" by Ellen Tischbein Schroy lists the value of an ice-green "Peacock on the Fence" plate at $325.

I have a framed Disney cel from 1939 with stickers of authenticity on the back of the frame. It is of the Ugly Duckling and measures approximately 8 by 6 inches.

Could you please tell me what the cel is worth?

A: Cels are the hand-painted drawings on celluloid that are photographed in sequence to make an animated cartoon. Those made by Disney are hot collectibles.

"Kovel's Antiques & Collectibles Price List" shows a similar cel of the Ugly Duckling, dated 1939, at $880.

Recently I inherited a "Sunbonnet Babies on Washing Day" cake plate. It is 10 1/4 inches in diameter. On the back of the plate it is marked "Royal Bayreuth." Is it true that the babies' names are Molly and Mae? I'd love to know the value of my cake plate.

A: Sunbonnet Babies Molly and Mae were created in 1902 by Berta L. Corbett, an American artist. She used these charming little figures to illustrate "Sunbonnet Babies Primer" by Eulalie Osgood Grover.

Royal Bayreuth made a complete line of china depicting the babies going about daily chores. The mark you described was used in the early 1900s.

Your plate would probably be worth about $400 in good condition.

Q: My grandmother handed down to me a silver-plated coffee service, which consists of a coffeepot, a creamer and sugar bowl with a lid.

Each piece is marked with an anchor over a crown and the words Derby Silver Co. -- Quadruple Plate.

Any information you may be able to offer will be appreciated.

A: Derby Silver Co. existed from 1873 to 1898, when it was consolidated with International Silver Co., which still operates today.

Quadruple plate means the pieces were silver-plated four times.

Your silver-plated coffee service would probably be valued about $165 to $185 in good condition.

Book review

"Belleek: The Complete Collector's Guide & Illustrated Reference, Second Edition" by Richard K. Degenhardt is published by Wallace-Homestead Book Co., an imprint of Chilton Book Co. It is available in antiques shops and bookstores for $60.

Mr. Degenhardt explains and illustrates in his second edition of "Belleek" how this elegant ware is created.

He chronicles its fascinating history, walks the reader through the manufacturing process and devotes an entire chapter to the evolution of Belleek marks.

Letters with picture(s) are welcome and may be answered in the column. We cannot reply personally or return pictures. Address your letters to Anne McCollam, 703 Peashway, South Bend, Ind. 46617.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.