EXCERPT (possibly explanatory

Salmagundi

note italicized words) from...

February 14, 1994

EXCERPT (possibly explanatory; note italicized words) from the press conference at which Deputy Attorney General Philip Heymann was asked about his decision to leave Attorney General Janet Reno's Justice Department:

Question: Mr. Heymann, I have to ask an important question.

Mr. Heymann: Don't do that. [Laughter.]

Q. Did you have problems working for a woman?

Mr. Heymann: No. I have no problems working with a woman.

* * *

OVERHEARD at a breakfast meeting in Carroll County last month:

Congressman Roscoe Bartlett, a Republican, approached U.S. Senator Paul Sarbanes, a Democrat, with his hand extended.

"Welcome to my district," said Mr. Bartlett.

Althugh he was momentarily taken aback, Mr. Sarbanes then grabbed Mr. Bartlett's hand, pumped it vigorously and said, "Welcome to my state."

* * *

FROM "Thinking About Our Kids: An Agenda for American Education," by Harold Howe II:

"An argument can be made that American public schools fall into two categories: (1) regular public schools that are diminished in their capacity to promote learning by a combination of low funding and lack of initiatives to bring about improved learning; and (2) suburban schools and a few city schools that have enough money to do a good job and have used that money wisely to build strong schools.

"This second group of schools, at least in its suburban manifestation, is really a group of semiprivate schools set up and maintained by parents who are willing to pay well for their children's education. Instead of sending their youngsters to expensive, private schools, these parents support high local property taxes and pay their teachers well. By using federal tax deductibility for their mortgage costs, these parents get Uncle Sam to join them in paying for schooling, and they also get some help from the state tax system as the state chips in for public schools and they deduct their state and local taxes on their federal tax returns. Viewed in this light, the school finance arrangements we have in this country are a system for promoting better schools for the children of the well-to-do."

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