Charles M. MastinTrucker, fire buffCharles M. Mastin, a...

February 04, 1994

Charles M. Mastin

Trucker, fire buff

Charles M. Mastin, a retired truck driver who for many years was treasurer of the Box 414 Association, the organization of fire buffs, died Monday at St. Agnes Hospital of complications of a respiratory illness.

He was 79 and lived in Baltimore Highlands.

He retired 17 years ago from Gypsum Haulage Inc., for which he had accumulated a million miles of accident-free driving. During his nearly 40 years of driving a tractor-trailer, he also had worked for the Preston Trucking Co. and Associated Transport Inc.

Born in Casterland, N.J., and reared in Virginia Beach, Va., Mr. Mastin came to Baltimore as a young man.

He was a member of Box 414 for 43 years and treasurer for nearly 17 years. Recently, he was the organization's dispatcher and earlier had driven its coffee wagon, from which members served refreshments to firefighters and police officers at emergencies and public events.

Charles E. Ashley, a former president of Box 414, said Mr. Mastin opened the group's fire museum on Thursdays and was a very willing worker.

Mr. Mastin won many awards from Box 414 and was recognized by WJZ-TV.

He was a member of the Glen Burnie Lodge of the Moose.

Services were to be held at 11 a.m. today at the McCully Funeral Home, 237 E. Patapsco Ave., Brooklyn.

Mr. Mastin is survived by his wife, the former Pearl G. Driver; three daughters, Debbie Chenworth and Penny Ann Definbaugh, both of Baltimore, and Joan Stein of Princess Anne; a son, Charles B. Mastin of Upper Marlboro; two sisters, Barbara White of Dillwyn, Va., and Anita Slinkard of Chaffee, Mo.; nine grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Mary Merryman, who helped raise funds for the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, died Monday of cystic fibrosis at her home in Dundalk. She was 23.

Diagnosed with the genetic lung and digestive disorder at the age of 7 months, she had been treated at Hopkins for much of her life.

She was a 1988 graduate of Dundalk High School, where she played

saxophone in the marching band. She also liked to ride motorcycles.

She was featured on last June's Children's Miracle Network Telethon on WMAR-TV and also on an annual fund-raising program on radio station WMIX-FM. She also had been a model in the "Fashion Makes You Feel Better" show at the Children's Center.

Dr. Susanna McColley, her physician at Hopkins, said, "Mary was an extremely bright and affectionate person. . . . Her strong will and determination were significant factors in her living as long as she did."

Services were to be held at 1 p.m. today at the Duda-Ruck Funeral Home, 7922 Wise Ave. in Dundalk.

She is survived by her companion, William Evering of Dundalk; her parents, Donald and Linda Merryman of Dundalk; two sisters, Tammy Willis and Linda Merryman, both of Baltimore; and her grandparents, Leo and Mary Kamasinski of Dundalk. Andrew J. Tamasik, a guidance counselor at City College since 1986, died Jan. 15 at his home on Theodore Avenue in Hamilton after a heart attack. He was 49.

He began working for the Baltimore public school system in 1970 as a counselor at Northern Parkway Junior High School. For brief periods before then, he was an orderly at the Seton Institute and a teacher at the Rosewood Center.

A native of Bayonne, N.J., he came to Maryland at the age of 13 to attend DeMatha High School in Hyattsville. After graduating in 1963, he entered the novitiate of the Order of the Holy Trinity in Pikesville.

Though he left the Trinitarians in 1970 before his ordination, he was a graduate of St. Mary's Seminary and University. He also held a master's degree from Loyola College.

A memorial service was to be held at 4:30 p.m. today in the media center at City College, 33rd Street and The Alameda.

He is survived by his wife of 22 years, the former Janice Rostkowski; his mother, Mary Tamasik of Piscataway, N.J.; and a brother, John T. Tamasik of Piscataway.

Jack W. Peterson

Baldwin store owner

Jack W. Peterson, a store owner who was known as the "mayor of Baldwin," died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 76.

He owned the Valley Wine Shop in Baldwin. The store was founded by his father and grandfather in the early 1940s as Peterson's Grocery. In 1946, he took over the store, changed its name and expanded its services -- alcoholic beverages, sandwiches and, later, video rentals.

"He knew everybody and everything that was going on around here," said his sister, Louise Klarman of Baltimore. "That's why he was called the 'mayor of Baldwin.' He loved being with his family, running the store and dancing."

Mr. Peterson was born in Christiansburg, Va., and moved to the Long Green Valley with his family in 1924. He was a 1934 graduate of Bel Air High School.

He worked at the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River during World War II.

His first wife, the former Evelyn Vitocolonna of Baltimore, whom he married in 1940, died in 1984.

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