Antietam Review turns 10 more theories on JFK death

Books & Authors

January 30, 1994|By James H. Bready

With its latest -- and biggest -- issue, Antietam Review enters its second decade. Based in Hagerstown, the Review is Maryland's only serious, nationally circulated literary magazine.

This time it publishes eight short stories, the work of 16 poets (one by a Romanian, Iona Ieronim, in translation) and 21 black-and-white photographs. There are interviews with Diane Wolkstein, storyteller, and Joyce Riser Kornblatt, professor of creative writing at the University of Maryland College Park.

Still basking in the glow of its inclusion in a recent "Best 50 Litmags From 50 States" listing, Antietam Review has received close to 500 verbal and photographic works from the United States and abroad for its 1994 issue. The deadline for submissions is tomorrow -- with self-addressed, stamped envelope -- at its new address, 7 W. Franklin St., Hagerstown 21740. The editors for fiction, poetry and photography are, respectively, Susanne Kass, Crystal Brown and Benita Keller, with Mrs. Kass as executive editor.

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Neil A. Grauer, who recently profiled Robert Benchley and Fred Allen for American Heritage magazine, has written a full-length biography of James Thurber (1894-1961) of the New Yorker. Titled "Remember Laughter," the book will be out from the

University of Nebraska Press in the fall.

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This is not an anniversary year, but the Kennedy-Dallas investigators carry on regardless. To a spectator, there is a noteworthy aspect to the conclusions of the two Baltimoreans most prominently involved. Harrison E. Livingstone ("High Treason I," "High Treason II," and last year "Killing the Truth: Deceit and Deception in the JFK Case") and Howard Donahue ("Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK," by Bonar Menninger) make points in common, unnoticed by the big-book authors elsewhere.

Mr. Donahue (a Towson gun expert) and Mr. Livingstone (at work on yet another book) agree that the fatal shot came in on a flat trajectory, not angled from the Texas Book Depository; and that the fatal bullet was hollow-headed, i.e., explosive, not the hard-casing, small-entry-and-exit variety in Lee Oswald's clip. Where the two differ is in the direction from which the bullet came: Mr. Donahue charting it from behind (the trailing Secret Service car) and Mr. Livingstone from in front (the grassy knoll).

Everything depends on the skull X-rays. Mr. Livingstone cites "sensational new evidence" that, in the form made public, these were forgeries.

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Addenda to 1993's books (listed here Jan. 2) by Marylanders or about Maryland: Under novels: "Chesapeake Song" by Brenda Lane Richardson. Under poetry: "The Book of Light," the latest from Lucille Clifton; Leon L. Lerner's third collection, "In These Strange Times: Poetry as News." Under romance fiction, "Crazy in Love" by M. C. Helldorfer (using the name K. J. Adams) and "A Gypsy at Almack's" by Chloe Cheshire (the pen name of Laura Schlitz); under nonfiction: Fred E. Katz's "Ordinary People and Extraordinary Evil: A Report on the Beguilings of Evil."

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Chatter: Gloria Naylor, novelist, is the speaker for Enoch Pratt Free Library's sixth annual Black History Luncheon Feb. 1 at noon, the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel; tickets $25. . . . Doris Kearns Goodwin, biographer, will speak on "To Preserve and Protect: The Story of the American Presidency," at 7 p.m. Feb. 15, at the Maryland Historical Society as an event in the society's 150th anniversary celebration. . . . Books from the collection of Huntington Williams, M.D., highlight Baltimore Book Co.'s periodic rare-book auction, Feb. 14 at 6:30 p.m., at the Timonium Plaza Holiday Inn, 2004 Greenspring Drive. . . . "An Evening of Irish Music and Poetry," with Seamus Heaney and the Celtic Thunder Band, starts at 8 p.m. Feb. 11 at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, Columbia, under the auspices of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society. . . . Lois Nicholson and Norman Macht, biographers of Cal Ripken Jr. and Rex Barney, respectively, are the Baltimore Writers' Alliance speakers Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m., at Elkridge Estates Clubhouse, 6025 Roland Ave. Topic: "Developing a Book From Concept Through to Publication."

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