Dr. Lee Alvin DuBridge, 92, president emeritus of the...

DEATH ELSEWHERE

January 25, 1994

Dr. Lee Alvin DuBridge, 92, president emeritus of the California Institute of Technology, died of pneumonia on Sunday at a retirement center in Duarte, Calif. He was an internationally known physicist who helped develop radar in World War II. He headed Caltech from 1946 until 1969, when President Richard M. Nixon appointed him White House science adviser. He retired from that position 18 months later but remained a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee. A gentle, unflappable man, he arrived at Caltech as it was veering away from the secret military projects of the World War II era and returning to fundamental science. He was faced with crowded classrooms, insufficient housing and overtaxed buildings. Under his guidance, the campus grew from 30 to 90 acres, its endowment from $17 million to more than $100 million, and the faculty from 260 to 550 members. Two major events during his tenure were the dedication of the 200-inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain and the opening of Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A native of Terre Haute, Ind., he graduated from Cornell College, in Mount Vernon, Iowa, and received his advanced degrees at the University of Wisconsin, where he began his academic career as an instructor. From 1934 to 1946, he was a professor of physics at the University of Rochester in New York and supervised the construction there of a cyclotron that produced the highest energy proton beam at the time. On leave of absence from Rochester, he headed the radiation laboratory established at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by the National Defense Research Committee. The purpose of the laboratory was to develop radar for the military, in the type of collaboration between science and the government that set the pattern for the Manhattan Project, which later developed the atomic bomb.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.