Janet S. JohnstonRetired librarianJanet Swart Johnston, a...

January 17, 1994

Janet S. Johnston

Retired librarian

Janet Swart Johnston, a retired librarian at Johns Hopkins University, died Friday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Union Memorial Hospital. The Glen Arm resident was 68.

An avid reader, musician and gardener, Mrs. Johnston was a graduate of both the Peabody Institute and the Johns Hopkins University, where she was employed in the main reading room of the library for eight years.

She was a member of the Bach Society, a choral arts group in Baltimore. She also sang in professional choirs at Emmanuel Episcopal Church and the Cathedral of the Incarnation, and played violin in several string quartets.

She was a good singer, but a better violinist, said her daughter, Jean Taylor Johnston of Monkton. She loved classical music and played the violin, despite advanced arthritis, until several months before her death.

A native of Yonkers, N.Y., Mrs. Johnston moved to Baltimore in 1943. Two years later, she helped establish "The Sunday Evening Club for Young Adults," a social group of nearly 200 members, at Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church.

Long active in garden and book clubs, Mrs. Johnston also served as a volunteer at James Lawrence Kernan Hospital, where she was a former member of the hospital board. She was also a member of the Baltimore Country Club and Johns Hopkins Alumni Club.

In addition to her daughter, Mrs. Johnston is survived by her husband of 43 years, Edward A. Johnston; another daughter, Elizabeth Janet Johnston of Atlanta, Ga., and three grandchildren.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld funeral home, 6500 York Road in Rodgers Forge, with interment at Loudon Park Cemetery. The family suggested donations to the Arthritis Foundation or the American Lung Association. Oliver Neal Mathews, an avid Baltimore sports fan, died of respiratory failure at his Joppatowne home Saturday after years of coping with muscular dystrophy. He was 24.

Family members said Saturday that Mr. Mathews' courage was shown in his perseverance after being diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy when he was 2 years old.

Sports were a key part of life for Mr. Mathews, who played Little League baseball in Loch Raven and football in Fullerton when he was younger. He did not become a wheelchair user until he was 14.

He later played in soccer and football games for wheelchair users at the Bennett Institute.

"Sports have done a lot for his life," said his mother, Lynn Talucci. "And I think he's done a lot for sports."

It was only with great reluctance that Mr. Mathews, an Orioles season-ticket holder, would miss a baseball game or pass up seeing the Baltimore Spirit indoor soccer team play. Mrs. Talucci recalled a time in 1991 when Mr. Mathews insisted on being driven to a Spirit game immediately after leaving a hospital room, where he had been treated for weeks for illness.

Sports celebrities and announcers visited him at his home. Others sent him souvenirs.

Mr. Mathews volunteered at the Muscular Dystrophy Association's Camp Maria, in Leonardtown, and studied the Bible with friends at Calvary Baptist Church in Dundalk. Lately, his family said, he also enjoyed the fellowship of the Oak Grove Baptist Church in Bel Air.

A graduate of Joppatowne High School, he also took courses at Harford Community College.

In addition to his mother, Mr. Mathews is survived by his stepfather, James Crosby Talucci; a brother, Todd Gerald Mathews of Dundalk; a sister, Molly Crawford Talucci of Joppatowne; a sister-in-law, Yvonne Westfall Mathews of Dundalk; a lifelong friend, Anthony Wade Graziano of Bel Air; and a nephew and niece.

Funeral services are scheduled for 11 a.m. today, at the Burgee-Henss Funeral Home, 3631 Falls Road. Memorial contributions may be made to the national chapter of the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Colin B. MacAdie, a longtime electrical engineer for Westinghouse Electric Corp. who retired as manager of the Radar Division, died Friday in a Fort Pierce, Fla., hospital. He was 76.

Mr. MacAdie, who retired in 1973, moved to Fort Pierce a year later. He had lived in Randallstown and Ellicott City during the 27 years he worked for Westinghouse.

Born in New York City, Mr. MacAdie moved to Baltimore in 1939, the year he earned his engineering degree from the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. He took a job with the Monitor Controller Co., and worked there until 1946, when he joined Westinghouse, said his son, Colin J. MacAdie of Hollywood, Fla.

While in Baltimore, Mr. MacAdie met and married his wife, the former Irene Zamenski.

When Mr. MacAdie moved to Fort Pierce, he maintained his interest in electronics and technology, building electronic devices at home and subscribing to numerous science magazines, his son said.

"My father was someone I could truly say who enjoyed his work," he said. "He was really amazed at all the recent technological advancements."

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