She'll always be a Parade photo winner, even with the unhappy development

December 13, 1993|By Wayne Hardin | Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer

The letter from Parade Magazine arrived Thursday, Dec. 2. It announced that Trisha Uttenreither, 16, a junior at Catonsville High School, was one of 100 winners nationwide in the Parade/Eastman Kodak photo contest.

It also said pictures selected for publication would be in the Dec. 5 issue of Parade, the Sunday supplement with a circulation of 37.2 million in 350 newspapers, including The Sun. There was even an advance copy enclosed of the Parade for the Orange County (Calif.) Register. And inside was Trisha's winning picture.

Imagine the excitement at the Uttenreither home as they waited for The Sunday Sun.

And then there it was. But, amazingly, without Trisha's picture.

"The kids were really disappointed," says Karl Uttenreither, Trisha's father. "After seeing the advance copy, they were sure it would be in The Sun."

Mr. Uttenreither and neighbors Robert Magnien and Kevin Burns, fathers of the children photographed by Trisha in her winning picture, expressed their puzzlement in a joint letter to The Sun.

While extending his regrets for the upset, Mike Perry, Parade's Northeast manager for newspaper relations, also has an explanation.

Blame it on national advertising.

"The magazine normally is 24 pages," Mr. Perry says. "But some may be smaller and some may be larger depending on how national advertisers want to focus on different parts of the country." He further explains that as issues are downsized regionally, the layouts have to be changed and some pages are dropped. There could be as many as 100 to 150 different versions of one issue.

The Sun's Parade was 20 pages with the one most important to the Uttenreithers among the missing.

Now, what about that picture that Baltimore didn't get to see until now?

Trisha took the photo with her 35mm camera for a journalism class assignment last spring. Michelle Magnien, 10, and Sarah Burns, 9, helped in the photographic conspiracy to capture the reaction of Bryant Magnien, 6, to an unanticipated, double-pucker kiss.

"I told the girls to do it," Trisha says. "But I didn't tell the little boy what they were going to do."

Trisha, who was named to The Baltimore Sun All-Baltimore City/Baltimore County volleyball team in November, credits her mother, Diane Uttenreither, with the idea to enter the contest that asked readers to photographically answer the question, "What does love mean to you?"

Parade said 233,400 photographers submitted entries. Forty-seven pictures were selected for publication from the 100 winners.

Despite winning in such competition, Trisha's not sure yet if she wants to be a photographer.

"Maybe photography," she says, "but definitely something with art."

Meanwhile, back in New York, Parade photo editor Miriam White has been fielding calls from those with situations similar to the Uttenreithers'.

"We've had maybe seven people in different states all upset about it," Ms. White says. "We've had the contest for six years. This is the first year it's happened to this extent. I've been apologizing to everyone."

Mr. Perry did some calculations and figures about 7.7 million Parades carried Trisha's picture. They were circulated in places like Atlanta, parts of the Northeast, Chicago and the West Coast.

And now they will have a limited distribution in Baltimore: He packaged a batch of those Parade issues to send to Trisha "so she'll have enough to give copies to her friends."

OTHER WINNERS

Four other Marylanders besides Trisha Uttenreither were included in the 100 winners of Parade's "Love" photography contest.

They were: Sandra Haines of Owings Mills, Peter Herscovitch of Chevy Chase, Eric Knoebel of Joppa and Julie Needham of Bethesda.

The Needham and Herscovitch pictures were among those that did appear in The Sun's version of Parade.

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