Hospital ends fiscal year with $247,000 surplus

December 09, 1993|By Jackie Powder | Jackie Powder,Staff report

Carroll County General Hospital is on track financially, based on figures from the first four months of fiscal 1994 that were released by hospital officials.

Kevin Kelbly, vice president for finance, said Carroll County General generated $16.5 million in operating and nonoperating revenue from July 1 through Oct. 31, which gave the hospital a surplus of $247,000.

Last year, the hospital had a bottom-line gain of $436,000 during the same period.

Mr. Kelbly attributed the decrease to shorter hospital stays and a decline in the use of the hospital's outpatient services.

The hospital's budget information was released Tuesday night at the Carroll County Health Services Corp.'s quarterly meeting of voting members. The corporation is the hospital's parent company. The voting members include more than 130 residents interested in health care.

William Gavin, the corporation's chairman, reported that the average hospital stay decreased from 5.6 to 5.4 days during the quarter.

The shorter stay resulted in a 1 percent drop in overall occupancy to 78 percent. The addition of 10 beds last summer, which brought the total to 158, contributed to the lower occupancy rate, Mr. Gavin said.

From July to October, the hospital had a 3 percent increase in admissions to more than 2,800 patients.

Mr. Gavin also said the hospital is on schedule in negotiations to buy the county health department building. He said Carroll County General plans to take possession of the building by October 1994.

The hospital plans to locate outpatient services, including an ambulatory surgery center, in the building.

Carroll County General Health Services Corp. plans to buy the building from the county for $4.5 million. The hospital will pay for the building with $2 million in cash and 100 acres of land in Hampstead that is valued at $25,000 an acre, said hospital spokeswoman Gill Chamblin.

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