Balkan Update

December 01, 1993

Muslim authorities in ZENICA have agreed "with sadness" to let Serbs and Croats leave, abandoning hopes of maintaining the multicultural society that made Bosnia unique. SARAJEVO and TUZLA still shelter Croats and Serbs whose loyalties to their home cities are stronger than ethnic ties. But these Serb and Croat communities also are shrinking.

Serb artillery battered the predominantly Muslim towns of MAGLAJ and TESANJ, Bosnian radio reported. Serb troops in the VARES region launched an infantry and tank attack on Bosnian army positions.

SARAJEVO was again without electricity or heat as light snow fell. The reason for the blackout was unclear. Heavier snow in western Bosnia closed aid routes from Croatia into central Bosnia, U.N. officials said. The snowfall in central Croatia was the heaviest in decades.

The Clinton administration, at a European security conference in ROME, said it was contributing an additional $150 million in aid for Bosnian civilians and doubling daily relief flights to Bosnia. He said the situation there had significantly improved.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.