With just a little effort, let them eat bread or nut cake, or pie

RECIPE FINDER

December 01, 1993|By Ellen Hawks | Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer

CORRECTION: Last week in Recipe Finder, the black walnu cake needed 2 cups of flour and should be baked at 325 degrees for 1 hour.

Once again, answers to requests bring more delicious dishes.

Zucchini bread made with pineapple, raisins and vanilla was the request of M. B. of Catonsville. Her request was answered by Kathy D. Schwender of Cockeysville.

Schwender's zucchini bread

3 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon

3/4 cups seedless raisins

3 eggs beaten

2 cups sugar

1 cup oil

2 teaspoons vanilla

2 cups coarsely chopped zucchini

1 (8-ounce) can crushed pineapple, well drained.

Combine first six ingredients. Beat eggs, add sugar, oil and vanilla beating until creamy; stir in zucchini and pineapple. Add dry ingredients stirring only until moistened.

Bake at 350 degrees for 50 to 55 minutes in greased and floured loaf pans (about 3 regular or 6 small) or bake 1 1/4 hours in a tube pan.

*

If it is cake you want, then try this black-walnut cake which Lillian Baltimore requested. Margaret D. Ramsburg of Frederick sent in a recipe called "Miss Mollie Eisenhauer's black walnut cake, and which came from an old Frederick family and has been used by my family for well over 75 years. We always baked one at Christmas," she wrote.

Ramsburg's black walnut cake

1 cup granulated sugar

3/4 cup butter

6 eggs

1 cup flour (sifted then measured)

1 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 cup brandy

3/4 cup black walnuts coarsely chopped

1 1/2 cups seedless raisins (dredged in 2 ounces flour)

Cream sugar and butter together. Add eggs, flour, nutmeg and brandy. Then fold in the walnuts and raisins. Bake in a greased and floured tube pan at 350 degrees for 3 hours. "Some ovens vary but cake generally cracks a bit at the top when done," says Mrs. Ramsburg. "When it has cooled, wrap in a brandy cloth and keep in a tin cake box. It will keep indefinitely."

*

A cottage cheese pie was the request of Katherine Bartley of Kelso, Wash., and Chef Gilles Syglowski's choice came from Dorrie Mednick of Baltimore.

Mednick's cottage cheese pie

Serves 6

1/2 pound cottage cheese

1/2 cup sugar

3 egg yolks

3 tablespoons flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons lemon juice

2 teaspoons grated lemon rind

1 cup light cream

3 egg whites

3 tablespoons sugar

In a large bowl, combine cottage cheese and 1/2 cup sugar. Add egg yolks, one at a time, and mix thoroughly. Stir in flour, salt, lemon juice and rind. Mix well, then add cream.

Beat egg whites adding 3 tablespoons of sugar gradually until stiff. Fold into cottage cheese mixture and pour into pie shell. Sprinkle with cinnamon, nutmeg or crumbs (optional) and bake at 325 degrees for 55 minutes.

*

Chef Syglowski, with chefs and students at the Baltimore International Culinary College, selected and tested these recipes.

Recipe requests

* Shirley Hoskins of Savannah, Mo., wants a recipe for Greek baklava. "I've never eaten it but it sounds so good," she wrote.

* Christine K. Roberts of Parkville wants a brown bag Betty. She explains it is an apple pie with a bottom crust. "The trick is you put the pie in a paper bag and staple it closed then bake. The bag gets crisp but does not burn."

* Mrs. Richard A. Young of St. Joseph, Mo., wants a meatless chili recipe.

* Mrs. V. Mays of Bowling Green, Ky., wants a chicken noodle casserole "which I have misplaced."

* Glenda Connell, Billingsley, Ala., wants recipes for pickled hot sausage and pickled eggs, "like the ones in large jars at stores and bars."

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request for a long-gone recipe, maybe we can help. Please print each response or request clearly on a separate sheet of paper with your name, address and phone number. Send to Ellen Hawks, Recipe Finder, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.