Boys slug it out in tie defense prevails for girls

November 23, 1993|By Rich Scherr | Rich Scherr,Contributing Writer

One game was a slugfest. The other was anything but.

But yesterday's Maryland Association of Coaches of Soccer 1993 All-State Games at UMBC Stadium had something in common that transcended the final outcomes.

They provided seniors with one last chance to play in high school.

"It's the ending of a long career," said Towson's Ian Wildey, a striker for the East. "I didn't want to see this come, but it was pretty exciting."

Wildey made it more exciting by scoring a first-half goal that gave his team a lead it held until the final minutes of the game. But with 3:43 left, Ben Ferry of Walt Whitman scored for the West and the game ended in a 2-2 tie.

For the Towson senior, however, scoring in his final high school game was a moment worth remembering.

definitely feels good to have scored a goal," said Wildey, who said he plans to begin his college career at either UMBC or Towson in the fall.

The score was anything but an indication of the West team's dominance. It outshot the East, 21-12, including 14-4 in the second half.

Kwesi Robotham (Wilde Lake) of the East and Brad Elwood (Clear Spring) of the West also scored in the first half of a wide-open game.

The girls' game, though, was a different story. Though the South held a 16-7 shot advantage, a late goal by Old Mill's Michelle Salmon gave the North a 1-0 win.

Aimee Vaughan (Dulaney) started the play near midfield, getting the ball and driving down the left side. She stopped 15 yards out, sent a cross-field pass that deflected off the foot of Carrie Jenkins (Linganore), and went to Salmon (Old Mill), who beat goalie Sheila Terry (Queen Anne's) to her left with 9:47 to play.

Winning coach Jim Horn (South Carroll) had a simple strategy.

really stressed to get the ball out wide," said Horn. "We started doing that in the second half, and that's what led to the goal."

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