Will Women Stop Being Victims?After reading the articles...

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

November 21, 1993

Will Women Stop Being Victims?

After reading the articles on the sexual misconduct charges leveled against Dr. Neil Solomon (and to which he confesses), I am moved to write this letter.

Ever since the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill controversy, I have listened to debates and resolutions over the issue of sexual harassment with great interest. What concerns me most about my observations is the fact that women who are claiming they are being "lured" into sexual acts with men, or who make accusations of sexual harassment years after the ordeal, are negatively impacting the advancement of women.

I do not, on any level, condone Dr. Solomon's actions, for I believe his unprofessional behavior is inexcusable and seriously undermines the doctor-patient relationship. However, at what point should women be held equally accountable for their acts? Are we to forever remain the victims of men? Isn't it about time women start examining the part they play in tolerating, and even encouraging, men's sexual advances and flirtations? . . .

Until women start taking charge of their own behavior, rather than relying on their perpetual "status" as victims, I'm afraid the gender-rift will continue to grow until we find that nobody is talking to anybody. . . .

Pamela Mones

Churchville

Harford's Finest

Stop me if you've heard this one: A high school kid busts his butt all summer to buy a cool car stereo. A week after he installs it, the car is stolen from his parents' driveway, stripped clean and totaled. Happens way too often in Bel Air, as I understand it. Tough luck, kid. Should've had better insurance. At least you learned one of life's difficult lessons, right?

Not exactly. Lt. Col. Tom Broumel of the Harford County's Sheriff Department assigned Detectives Mike Connolly and Rick Lyne to investigate. With very little to go on, they cracked the case in 20 days. If I knew the others who assisted them, I'd mention their names too. . . . I, for one, would like to offer my sincere appreciation and commendation to the department, and, in particular, to the three professionals aforementioned. Maybe the kid did learn a tough lesson, but he also gained a heightened level of respect and admiration for Harford County's finest (and so did I).

Jim Dalton

Bel Air

Name of the Game

In The Sun Oct. 27 I read that Hugh McColl, the chief executive officer of NationsBank (which has taken over Maryland National Bank) had tears of joy fill his eyes when Charlotte was given a National Football League team.

Since Mr. McColl is subsidizing the Charlotte team with some of our money, I suggest that we put some real tears in Mr. McColl's eyes by doing our banking business with a bank that has its headquarters in Baltimore.

Let's play hardball with Mr. McColl, close the accounts, move the money.

Donald Irwin

Bel Air

Recycling

It is truly a shame that Harford County government could allow an environmental threat and travesty to develop with what seems to be typical bureaucratic indifference.

Over the past two years, there have been several news items in various media about the concentrated and deadly poisons in discarded household batteries. Because of this I have faithfully collected worn-out batteries from all of my family's battery-powered devices. I have filled a large coffee can with these old batteries and I took them to the Susquehannock Recycling Center. An earlier news article indicated they would carry out proper disposal.

I was upset to be told that they no longer had the facility or support of county funds to take care of such batteries, and that I should "throw them in the trash." To make matters worse, I learned that the recycling center has three 55-gallon drums filled with old batteries which may also have to be sent to a local landfill. The poisons from these batteries will eventually leach into our ground water and Chesapeake Bay.

I believe whatever financial commitment the county must make to properly dispose of this threat to our environment is worthwhile and necessary. Copies of this letter have been sent to each County Council member, as well as the county executive.

harles Hanssen

Bel Air

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