Poet player, 17, dies autopsy set Basketball player's death stuns Poets

November 16, 1993|By David Michael Ettlin and Lem Satterfield | David Michael Ettlin and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writers

Baltimore City police and school officials are awaiting an autopsy report on a Dunbar High School basketball player who died Sunday night after collapsing at his home.

Antoine "Stevie" Greene, 17, was a senior at Dunbar and had been expected to make the varsity team.

"It has really cast a shadow over things. He was a very popular kid who I believe played on junior varsity," said Dunbar's new basketball coach, Paul Smith. "We were expecting him to augment our backcourt."

Principal Charlotte Brown learned of the death Sunday night, and arranged to have crisis counselors at Dunbar to help Greene's friends deal with their grief and shock, said school system spokeswoman Donna Franks.

"The children are distraught," the principal said. "They're human. We're working with them, we've had [crisis] interventions and all kinds of counseling services all day. We'll continue to do that, especially for his teammates, because they had bonded as a group."

Police and fire officials said Greene's mother or grandmother called the 911 emergency number at 4:22 p.m. Sunday, reporting that he had been "lethargic" all day and asking for an ambulance.

Paramedics arriving at the house in the 400 block of N. Bradford St. minutes later immediately called for more help because the teen-ager had gone into cardiac arrest.

Greene was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital at 4:59 p.m., authorities said. His body was taken to the state medical examiner's officer for an autopsy.

Agent Doug Price, a police spokesman, said the mother told officers that Greene had seemed ill for several weeks, with symptoms including lethargy, vomiting and "altered" behavior.

She told officers that Greene explained to her that he had been in an accident on his motorbike, the spokesman said.

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