Neighborhood group may cut budget Next year's plan down by 20%

November 11, 1993|By Andrea F. Siegel | Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer

With less money to spend, the Glen Burnie Improvement Association is planning a $148,647 budget for next year, down from the current $185,000 spending plan.

Donations to community organizations would be cut by more than half -- down to about $14,300 -- under the budget proposed Tuesday night. Money for maintaining the association's property and paying legal fees also would be cut, but not as drastically.

The smaller budget is the result of plummeting return rates on investments and reduced profit from the association's annual summer carnival, said Don Gibson, treasurer. Certificates of deposit that were yielding 7 percent have come due, and can be renewed for only half that rate, he said.

"We just don't have the income this year," Mr. Gibson said.

Rainy weather kept the usual crowds away from the Big Glen Burnie Carnival last summer. Bad weather forced an early closing on its second Friday night, which historically has been the most profitable, and it rained again on the last day.

GBIA raised about $91,400 from the carnival this year. In 1992, the figure was about $124,600.

But the GBIA hardly has fallen on hard times, Mr. Gibson said. It is participating in a residential sidewalk program for a second year, in which it and homeowners each pay one-fourth of the fee for replacing a sidewalk while the county pays the other half. It plans to continue its autumn

health and safety fair.

North Arundel Hospital, which had received $5,000 a year and more than $125,000 since 1964, will get only $2,500 next year.

"We understand. It's tough economic times for everybody," said Kevin Murnane, hospital spokesman.

The contribution to the Glen Burnie Volunteer Fire Company was cut by half, to $2,500. Donations to the YMCA and the American Red Cross, which got $500 and $1,000, respectively, last year, have been cut entirely.

The organization's building upkeep fund is scheduled to drop from $104,500 this year to $92,200 next year, partly because some expensive repairs have been made.

Community program expenditures are also due to shrink slightly.

The budget is scheduled for discussion and a vote in December.

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