School board to conduct late session 5 p.m. meeting to get trial run

November 08, 1993|By Anne Haddad | Anne Haddad,Staff Writer

Parents who work late might be disappointed, but the Board of Education will try having its monthly meeting later in the day Wednesday.

The meeting is scheduled to begin at 5 p.m. at the Carroll County Career and Technology Center.

It will be the first regular evening meeting since 1986. The school board has met at night since then only for one-issue meetings and hearings, such as those held to discuss the school budget or redrawing district lines.

Evening meetings are an idea that C. Scott Stone stressed in his campaign last fall. He raised the issue shortly after he joined the board, but not with a firm schedule.

"I raised it under old business as an idea," he said. "The feedback was not generally encouraging, even though there was no strong opposition. I just let that sit idle for a bit."

Board member Ann M. Ballard has said that night meetings in the past did not bring out more parents and that they can end very late. School board meetings typically last four hours or more.

In addition to Mr. Stone, Joseph D. Mish has been the only board member to openly support later meetings. But all members agreed to Mr. Stone's proposal to hold at least one night meeting and see how it goes.

"I'm encouraged the board agreed to try it," Mr. Stone said. "Maybe we could try it again in early 1994."

Mr. Stone would like to see parents there, but said he won't give up the idea if there is a poor turnout.

"It's not that [parents] will come every time," he said.

"It's that government has the obligation to create the opportunity for people to be there. I don't know what to expect."

The board decided not to take a break for dinner because that would extend the meeting and disrupt continuity.

"I'm making a point of getting a brief bite to eat before going over there," Mr. Stone said.

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