Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol...

VOTES IN CONGRESS

October 24, 1993|By Roll Call Report Syndicate

Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:

Y: YES N: NO X: NOT VOTING

HOUSE: TO KILL SUPER COLLIDER

The House voted -- 282 for and 143 against -- to terminate the superconducting super collider project in Waxahachie, Texas. It was included in the Department of Energy's fiscal 1994 budget (HR 2445). The Senate went along, and the huge research project has been declared ended by supporters and foes in Congress. The super collider would have conducted high-speed proton collisions in an underground loop, yielding information on the origin of matter. About $2 billion toward a projected $11 billion cost to taxpayers has been spent. The bill calls for spending $640 million to shut the super collider down.

A yes vote was to kill the super collider.

Y N X Member

* N * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: JOBLESS CHECKS

By a vote of 302 for and 95 against, the House passed a bill (HR 3167) providing an additional four months, until Feb. 5, in which the long-term jobless can qualify for additional unemployment checks after exhausting their basic 26-week allotment. Some of the estimated $1.1 billion cost will be offset by limiting Supplemental Security Income welfare payments to recent legal immigrants. But most of the tab is to be paid over five years by a plan to return the jobless to work earlier, through better state retraining mandated by the bill.

The legislation is expected to give 750,000 workers in all states seven or 13 weeks of additional checks. The emergency program of extended benefits was enacted two years ago as a temporary measure in response to the recession. Its cost has been about $25 billion.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: BENEFITS ISSUE

By a vote of 128 for and 277 against, the House rejected an amendment to limit the latest round of extended jobless benefits (HR 3167) to states with at least five percent unemployment. The amendment would have excluded from the program 10 states with relatively low unemployment -- Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wisconsin.

A yes vote supported the amendment.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

* N * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

* N * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: SELECTIVE SERVICE

The House voted, by 236 for and 194 against, to preserve the Selective Service, which registers 18-year-olds for any restoration of the military draft. This reversed a House vote four months earlier to kill the agency, and put the House in agreement with the Senate that the Selective Service should be kept alive. The vote approved a $25 million service budget as part of a multi-agency fiscal 1994 appropriations bill (HR 2491).

A yes vote to preserve the Selective Service.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

* N * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

SENATE: COMMAND ISSUE

By a vote of 33 for and 65 against, the Senate rejected an amendment to prevent foreign commands other than NATO from sending American troops into combat. The amendment was aimed mainly at United Nations commands such as those for Somalia, Bosnia and Haiti. It was offered to a fiscal 1994 defense appropriations bill (HR 3116) later sent to conference with the House.

A yes vote was to prohibit United Nations commanders from sending American troops into combat.

Y N X Member

* N * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

* N * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: CIVILIAN MARKSMANSHIP

By a vote of 67 for and 30 against, the Senate decided to continue the Civilian Marksmanship Program that will spend $2.5 million in fiscal 1994 to help the National Rifle Association and private gun clubs teach shooting skills to young people. The Pentagon provides guns and ammunition to clubs participating in the 90-year-old government program. The vote occurred during debate on the 1994 defense appropriations bill (HR 3116).

A yes vote was to continue the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

Y N X Member

Y * * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

* N * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

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