Twice-honored Eckman can't make Hall banquet

SIDELINES

October 17, 1993|By PAT O'MALLEY

Glen Burnie's Charley Eckman is in line for a couple of more honors, one of which will take him away from Thursday's third annual Anne Arundel County Sports Hall of Fame Banquet.

Eckman, a member of the Hall of Fame's first induction class in 1991, was scheduled as a co-guest speaker with ex-Baltimore Colt great Art Donovan, but Eckman instead will be in Harrisburg, Pa.

"I really regret that I can't attend the Hall of Fame banquet and expected to be there before this came up at the last minute," said Eckman.

"They're honoring me at Penn National for starting the World Series of Handicapping, and it happens to be Thursday night."

Eckman, 72, started the $100,000 World Series of Handicapping at Penn National in Harrisburg 20 years ago, and it has gained national attention.

"I was there at the inception, and we've never had a problem. It's been great," he said.

Former Arundel High and University of Maryland star running back Louis Carter will be inducted Thursday at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie, along with Doris Jenkins and Roger "Pip" Moyer.

Jenkins, a Linthicum resident, is a former fast-pitch softball great and player/coach.

Moyer, a lifelong Annapolis resident, was a standout basketball player at Annapolis High and the University of Baltimore.

Proceeds from the $25-a-ticket banquet will benefit Anne Arundel County youth sports.

Hall of Fame golf outing

The Anne Arundel County Sports Hall of Fame also is sponsoring its first golf outing at Walden Country Club in Crofton tomorrow.

Wayne Fowler, Severn School head basketball coach, is chairman of the golf outing, which will also raise money for county youth sports.

Fowler, assisted by Susan Davies and Vickie Bowen -- along with Walden golf pro George Jakovics -- have put together a day of fun and games for all those entered with county youth sports reaping the benefits.

"We should have a pretty good turnout, and hope to build on this for the future, and make it one of our top fund-raisers," said Fowler.

Severn recruits

Fowler has landed two pretty good basketball players in juniors Alhamisi Simms and Jaylonnie Booth for his first season as Severn's basketball coach. Simms started occasionally at Annapolis last year and Booth started at Broadneck.

Fowler, who succeeds Jim Doyle as the Severn coach, coached Simms, Booth and returning junior Admiral John Vereen on a summer AAU team that fared well in a national tournament.

Replacing Ross at Annapolis

Interviews for the vacant Annapolis girls basketball coaching position will be conducted tomorrow with six to seven candidates expected to show up. Among the candidates is veteran coach Dave Griffith, who assisted the departed Teresa Ross.

In three seasons, Ross built the Panthers from a league doormat into a playoff team, but moved to Kansas City last spring. Ross got married and her husband is employed in Kansas.

Ross said before she left that "Dave would be ideal for the job because of continuity in the program, which I think is pretty important."

Griffith, who also coached girls basketball at Glen Burnie, wants the job, and many girls and boys coaches around the county feel he would do a great job. The final decision lies in the hands of principal Laura Webb and athletic director Fred Stauffer.

Multi-talented

Did you know that Annapolis junior Lenny Barber might be one of the tallest marching band drummers in the country?

Barber, who also plays basketball for the Panthers, is 6 feet 7 and can sing, too.

Annapolis football fans have delighted in Barber's singing Temptations songs at halftime of the Panther games at Al Laramore Field.

Several band members and Barber have dressed up like the famous Motown group and performed their rendition of "My Girl" on two occasions and each time brought the house down. The games have been shown on Annapolis Cable TV as well, giving Barber and mates more local exposure.

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