Jay J. CarberryMerchant seamanJay J. Carberry, a retired...

OBITUARIES

October 15, 1993

Jay J. Carberry

Merchant seaman

Jay J. Carberry, a retired merchant seaman and custodian, died of complications from a stroke Thursday at Liberty Medical Center in Baltimore.

The Pikesville resident was 64.

Mr. Carberry's career as a merchant seaman began in 1946 and was interrupted by Army service in 1950. He was a truck driver at Fort Meade, Fort Holabird and in Germany and was discharged in 1952 with the rank of corporal.

He returned to sea, working out of the National Maritime Union halls in Baltimore and New York City until he retired in 1983. He then went to work as a custodian for the Baltimore County school system, retiring in 1988.

Reared in Northwest Baltimore, he received his early education at St. Peter Claver parochial school on Fremont Avenue.

Known as J.C., Mr. Carberry enjoyed listening to classical music and opera.

He married the former Doris Reed, a librarian at The Sun, in 1956.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sisters, Dorothy B. Harris and Helen Byrd, both of Baltimore, and numerous nieces and nephews.

A viewing is set for 11:30 a.m. today, followed by services at noon at the Joseph L. Russ Funeral Home, 2222 W. North Ave. Interment will be in Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery, 11501

Garrison Forest Road, Owings Mills. Lucia H. Fickenscher, a retired retirement benefits analyst for the Baltimore City pension system, died Sunday at Good Samaritan Hospital after a lengthy pulmonary illness.

Mrs. Fickenscher, who was 60, worked for the city's retirement system for 27 years, advancing to the position of supervisor.

She retired Aug. 25, 1989, because of illness.

At that time, then-Comptroller Hyman A. Pressman presented her with a merit award. In June 1987, she received a similar award for "splendid quality of public service" and was named an admiral of the Baltimore Harbor.

The former Lucia Heaps was born in Baltimore and reared in Pylesville. At the age of 14, she moved to Baltimore with her family.

After the death of her father, Mrs. Fickenscher, the eldest of four daughters, was forced to leave Eastern High School to go to work. She took a job as a clerk in the city's retirement system in 1952 and obtained her high school equivalency diploma while she worked.

In 1958, she married William E. Fickenscher. Two years later, the couple moved from Charles Village to just north of the city line in Towson, and Mrs. Fickenscher left the city's employ to rear her two children. She returned to City Hall in September 1970 to work again for the retirement system.

In her retirement, despite her illness, Mrs. Fickenscher remained active in the community and volunteered at City Hall, Alcoholics Anonymous, Immanuel Lutheran Church, where she worshiped, and other organizations.

In addition to her city merit awards, she received a certificate from the Classified Municipal Employees Association in November 1988.

A memorial service was set for 2 p.m. today at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Loch Raven Boulevard and Belvedere Avenue, Baltimore.

In addition to her husband, she is survived by a son, Karl Fickenscher of Towson; a daughter, Lisa Fickenscher of Baltimore; and three sisters, M. Barton Heaps of Glen Rock, Pa., Alison H. Pena of New Orleans and Frances Heaps of Takoma Park.

The family suggested memorial contributions may be made to Bea Gaddy's Women and Children's Center.

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Donald C. Houtz

Former steel worker

Donald C. Houtz, a former steelworker, died Monday of heart failure at his home on Highpoint Road in the Clearwater Beach section of Pasadena.

Mr. Houtz, 65, retired in 1981 after 37 years at the Bethlehem Steel Corp. plant at Sparrows Point.

A native of Glascob, Pa., he served in the Marine Corps during World War II.

Services were set for 9:30 a.m. today at the Gonce Funeral Home, 169 Riviera Drive, Riviera Beach.

He is survived by his wife, the former Florence Rasinski; a son, Fred Beckner of Tampa, Fla.; his mother, Anna Houtz of Baltimore; three brothers, Gary, Rod and Dale Houtz, all of Baltimore; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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