Taneytown resident proposes killing pesky starlings at woods

October 14, 1993|By Traci A. Johnson | Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer

A Taneytown resident has proposed killing the starlings that have plagued the Carnival Drive neighborhood since June.

Gail Ansari, a resident who brought her concerns about the continuing problem to the City Council, said that she has information that could provide a solution.

"I have this pamphlet on prevention and control of wildlife damage, and it tells about things that can be done about it," said Ms. Ansari.

She told the council Monday that "the sky is black with birds" above her home just before they roost in woods near the Fairgrounds Village area.

Her original suggestion was to have property owners cut down )) the trees to eliminate the birds' roosting place, but she says her new information outlines a better course of action.

"There are these pellets you can feed to them," Ms. Ansari said. "They die within two to three days of eating them."

Ms. Ansari suggests that the city put the pellets in the woods and post signs telling people to keep out.

"It is toxic to other types of birds in varying degrees, but I really don't see other types of birds around," Ms. Ansari said.

"Now, I see nothing but them [starlings]. It's like they took over the neighborhood."

Residents have been complaining for months about the birds, which reportedly destroy the trees and drop excrement on cars and throughout the wooded area, where Ms. Ansari said neighborhood children play.

She said Monday that the starlings are a health hazard and should be killed or chased from the area.

Mayor Henry I. Reindollar and the City Council agreed to have a county Health Department representative study the situation and report back to them.

Ms. Ansari said that although she was told it is illegal to kill starlings, some literature says starlings are not protected under any national law.

"We have to find out what the legal status is here," Ms. Ansari said.

"But we've got to do something. I don't know how much it will cost, but something has to be done."

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