Olney Theatre produces a winter season

ARTS NOTES

October 10, 1993|By Linell Smith | Linell Smith,Staff Writer

For the first time in its history, Olney Theatre will produce a winter season of plays, including a world premiere and an off-Broadway drama. The plays and their dates follow:

"For Reasons That Remain Unclear," a new play by Mart Crowley, author of "The Boys in the Band," concerns a confrontation between two men over a traumatic episode in their past. It runs Nov. 9-28 with actors Philip Anglim and Ken Ruta.

"Holiday Memories," a play adapted from two Truman Capote short stories about his childhood in rural Alabama, runs Dec. 7-26.

"Sight Unseen," by Donald Margulies, examines the strange state of the art world in the late 20th century. The 1992 off-Broadway success will run March 8-27.

Performances of all three plays are at 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sundays. For more information about the winter season and about tickets, call (301) 924-3400.

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Actor Devron Troy Young, a graduate of the Baltimore School for the Arts, has received an award of $5,000 from the Educational Testing Service Arts Recognition and Talent Search (ARTS) and has also been named a Presidential Scholar in the Arts.

Mr. Young participated in the annual ARTS program of the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. This program is designed to identify and reward exceptionally talented high school seniors who are artists.

The Baltimore native will study theater and modern broadcasting at the University of Maryland at College Park. He is a gold medal winner in the regional NAACP Afro-Academic Cultural Technological and Scientific Olympics and the recipient of a scholarship from Arena Players.

The award of $5,000 underwrote the expenses associated with Mr. Young's participation in the ARTS '93 program in Miami and also provided him with $1,500 in cash.

Based in Miami, NFAA encourages emerging artists in all art forms by assisting them financially and by creating opportunities for them to further their education and advance their professional careers.

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David Lockington, assistant conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, has been promoted to associate conductor of the orchestra.

In addition to regularly conducting the BSO, the 36-year-old musician assists in planning the orchestra's 57 youth concerts. Last year, he was appointed to the Affiliate Artists/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Program, and he also serves as music director with the Ohio Chamber Orchestra.

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Performers are invited to enter the 10th Annual Indian Music and Dance Competition, a national competition focusing on the performing arts traditions of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, which is scheduled Dec. 3-5 at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Sponsored by UMBC and the Academy of Indian Music and Fine Arts, the competition is open to performers of all ages in instrumental music, classical and folk dance and vocal music. It is the only competition of its kind on the East Coast.

The deadline for entries is Nov. 16. For details, call the Academy of Indian Music at (410) 747-3950.

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Maryland artists can learn about visual arts fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Maryland State Arts Council by attending a free workshop at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 at Maryland Art Place, 218 W. Saratoga St.

Rosilyn Alter, director of the the visual arts program at the NEA, and Michele Moure, director of the visual arts program at MSAC, will lecture on the grant application and grant selection processes. For details, call (410) 962-8565.

Auditions

Auditions for "White Secrets, Dark Lies," a new comedy-drama by Kevin Brown, are scheduled from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. today and from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow and Tuesday at the Metropolitan Theatre at Nirvana, 1727 N. Charles St. The play, which will premiere in mid-November, calls for a multiracial cast of 11 actors and actresses. For details, call (410) 685-9428.

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