Schoeneman to make, sell Nicole Miller clothing No new employment seen initially

September 30, 1993|By Ross Hetrick | Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer

J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based menswear manufacturer, has signed an exclusive license with designer Nicole Miller to produce and market her new line of men's, boys' and selected women's wear.

The contract will not result in higher employment initially, although James J. Stankovic, Schoeneman's president and chief executive officer, said that "over the next few years, I feel confident it will add jobs." That will be determined, he said, on the demand for the clothing line.

Nicole Miller is the latest addition to the Schoeneman stable of designer labels, including Burberry, Christian Dior and Halston. Schoeneman, which specializes in high-end menswear, is part of Plaid Clothing Group Inc., which is headquartered in New York.

The new line of clothing, which will be in stores by June, is expected to produce sales of between $5 million and $10 million annually, according to Bud Konheim, chief executive officer of Nicole Miller Ltd. in New York.

Nicole Miller is known for neckties and men's accessories that feature such illustrations as Absolut vodka bottles, tabloid headlines and the contents of a medicine cabinet.

The new line will include men's and women's blazers with pewter buttons in the shape of baseballs, golf balls, tennis balls and other types of balls. The linings will have different sport themes, such as programs from past World Series.

The jackets will sell from $375 to $700 each, Mr. Stankovic said.

Most of the menswear and women's wear will be produced at Schoeneman's Chambersburg, Pa., plant, which has 1,213 workers. Rainwear will be made at the company's Bel Air plant, which has 97 workers.

The boys' wear in the line will be produced at a New Bedford, Mass., plant, operated by the Palm Beach Co., another division of Plaid Clothing, Mr. Stankovic said.

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