Rev. T. J. HigginsCatholic educator, 94The Rev. Thomas J...

OBITUARIES

September 21, 1993

Rev. T. J. Higgins

Catholic educator, 94

The Rev. Thomas J. Higgins, S.J., a former president of what is now St. Joseph University in Philadelphia who later served as philosophy department chairman at Loyola College, died Saturday of heart failure at the Jesuit residence at the Philadelphia school.

Father Higgins, who was 94, had joined the administration of what was then St. Joseph College in 1929 and served as its president from 1933 until he came to Baltimore in 1939. He was also pastor of the Gesu Roman Catholic Church for a time in Philadelphia.

He taught ethics at Loyola and was chairman of the Philosophy Department from 1959 until 1966.

He served as a judge of the marriage tribunal of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and was professor emeritus at Loyola from 1972 until he retired to Philadelphia in 1987.

Dr. Nicholas Varga, professor emeritus of history and archivist at Loyola, said he and Father Higgins often disagreed about the Constitution, "but always remained very friendly."

He praised the priest's intellect and described him as "an honest arguer" who was very serious and "though he would listen, held very strong opinions on things he thought through."

He said that when he was a Boston College student he became acquainted with Father Higgins through one of the priest's eight books, "Man as Man," a textbook widely used in Jesuit schools.

Father Higgins was awarded the President's medal at Loyola College and in 1990 received the papal honor Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice for his work for the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

He was a member of the Canon Law Society of America, the Jesuit Philosophical Association and the American Catholic Philosophical Association.

Born in Philadelphia, he was a 1915 graduate of St. Joseph's Preparatory School there before beginning his preparation for ordination as a member of the Society of Jesus.

He earned bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees at Woodstock College, the old Jesuit seminary in Baltimore County.

Ordained in 1928, he earlier was an instructor in classical literature and languages at the Boston College High School.

A Mass of Christian burial was to be offered at 7:30 tonight in the chapel of St. Joseph University.

Father Higgins is survived by five nieces.

Brother Corby Duffy

Xaverian coordinator

Brother Corby Duffy, C.F.X., per- PHOTOsonnel coordinator in the Baltimore-Washington area for the Xaverian Brothers, died Saturday of a heart attack at St. Agnes Hospital.

Brother Corby, who was 59 and lived in Catonsville, had held the personnel post since 1988 and also was a chaplain at Union Memorial Hospital and development director for St. William of York parish.

An English and history teacher, he was a member of the faculty of what is now Seton-Keough High School from 1985 to 1988 and principal of St. Clement's School in Lansdowne from 1982 to 1985.

From 1971 to 1982, he taught at Mount St. Joseph High School, which is operated by his order.

Earlier, he taught in elementary and secondary schools in the New York City area and at St. Xavier High School in Louisville, Ky.

The former John J. Duffy was a native of Staten Island, N.Y., and joined the brothers of St. Francis Xavier in 1951 at a novitiate the order maintained at Fortress Monroe, Va.

He was a 1962 graduate of Fordham University and also did graduate work there and at St. John's University.

A Mass of the Resurrection was to be offered at 7:30 p.m. today at St. Joseph's Passionist Monastery Church, Old Frederick Road and Monastery Avenue in Baltimore.

Survivors include three nephews; four nieces; and 14 grandnieces and grandnephews. Kathleen Marie Clarken, a retired social worker who was active in the Baltimore community after moving to the Versailles Apartments in Towson in 1989, died Wednesday of cancer at Union Memorial Hospital.

Mrs. Clarken, who was 73, studied at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland as a member of its Renaissance Institute for the elderly, was a docent at the Mount Clare Mansion, and was a member of the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery.

She was also a volunteer driver for Meals on Wheels, and she was fond of attending chamber music concerts.

The former Kathleen Marie Hugel was a native of Orange, N.J., and a graduate of Rosemont College in Pennsylvania. She earned a master's degree from Rutgers University.

She had been a social worker for Catholic Charities of New Jersey and, from 1970 until her retirement in 1981, for the Newark, N.J., school system.

She moved to Towson from Montclair, N.J., and also had a summer home in Stonington, Maine.

Her husband, Joseph B. Clarken, died in 1964.

She is survived by five sons, George F. Clarken of Towson, Terence J. Clarken of Caldwell, N.J., Joseph B. Clarken of Hillsdale, N.J., Michael P. Clarken of Tucson, Ariz., and Thomas W. Clarken of Chester, N.Y.; a daughter, Margaret C . Davis of Richmond, Va.; and two granddaughters.

A memorial Mass was offered yesterday in the chapel of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.

T. N. Nicholson IV

MICROS executive

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