Ordinance to reduce noise due final council vote tonight Varied objections have been raised

September 20, 1993|By John Rivera | John Rivera,Staff Writer

An anti-noise ordinance that has prompted a few howls of protest goes before the County Council tonight for a final vote.

The bill, sponsored by Councilman Carl G. Holland, would ban music or noise in residential neighborhoods that could be heard 50 feet from its source.

Violators would be fined $50 for the first offense, after which the fine would increase by $50 for each subsequent offense until the fourth violation, when it would leap to $500 and the offender could be jailed for as long as 30 days.

A variety of people have raised concerns about the bill, including the owner of a stereo store, young people who fear it would be used by police as an excuse to harass them and musicians worried that practicing would earn them a ticket.

To address the last concern, Councilwoman Maureen Lamb intro

duced an amendment, which was approved, that would provide an exception for musical instruments if the practicing did not go beyond 11 p.m.

The Greater Severna Park Council weighed in last week, declining to support the bill, saying that, among other things, it might prohibit family picnics where music was being played.

The council also will consider a resolution urging County Executive Robert R. Neall to proceed with a feasibility study on the possibility of taking over Tipton Army Airfield for use as a commercial airport. The resolution was introduced by council Chairman David G. Boschert, who is a strong advocate of developing the airport at Fort Meade and possibly putting a MedEvac helicopter pad there.

Mr. Neall has delayed using a $175,000 grant to study Tipton until the Army tells him it wants to transfer the field. The National Security Agency objected to a possible transfer last year, citing security concerns.

The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the council chambers at the Arundel Center in Annapolis.

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