* Stanley L. Kaufman, 81, a lawyer who specialized in...

OBITUARIES

September 08, 1993

* Stanley L. Kaufman, 81, a lawyer who specialized in bringing lawsuits on behalf of disgruntled stockholders, died of cancer Saturday in New York. In the 1950s, he successfully represented mutual-fund shareholders in the first case in which the courts required management fees to be substantially reduced as the mutual funds grew. The case set an industry standard. The Harvard Law School graduate was previously an attorney with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

70, a Broadway and off-Broadway theater critic for the Newhouse News Service, died on Saturday at New York University Medical Center.

* Leonard Bocour, 80, an artist and paint manufacturer involved in the vogue of acrylic painting that swept modern art in the 1960s, died Monday at his New York home. He started the Bocour Artist Colors paint factory in midtown Manhattan in 1932 and operated it until he retired in 1986. At the time of the factory's founding, he was apprenticed to the European painter Emil Ganso. He had been grinding his own pigments, and Mr. Ganso advised him to sell his paints, which he did for a price artists could afford more readily than commercial products. He kept in touch with artists and they often brought him their special requests. In the 1940s, he began experimenting with acrylic resins as a base for paint. Decades of work resulted in the lines of acrylic resin and polymer-based paints he introduced when the fast-drying synthetic paints became the rage with artists and the public. In the 1950s, when painters tended toward large canvases, he began to market a king-size paint tube for them. He taught at the Brooklyn Museum Art School and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine.

* Louis Archibald Gillies,Louis Archibald Gillies, 90, a retired rear admiral who commanded the New York Naval Militia until he retired in 1962 after 42 years of service, died Aug. 31 in Warwick, R.I.

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