Nouveau furniture, tooSince Nouveau Contemporary Goods...

ON THE HOME FRONT

August 08, 1993|By Elizabeth Large | Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer

Nouveau furniture, too

Since Nouveau Contemporary Goods opened seven years ago, owners Lee Whitehead and Steve Appel have always planned to sell furniture. But it wasn't until the jewelry store below their shop moved out that they were able to open a showroom for their art deco, '50s and avant-garde contemporary finds. It was a simple matter of knocking through a wall, unlocking a door and uncovering a staircase to the lower level.

The two were pretty sure the customers were there: When thetest-marketed '30s-style couches by Klote, they found the pieces sold very well. With the 1,500 square feet downstairs, they can display the work of new artists they found at High Point, as well as local designers. Further expansion is planned; by Christmas two back rooms will be included in the showroom.

Nouveau, located at 519 N. Charles St., is open Monday through Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. Call (410) for more information.

It sounds like an environmentally correct gardener's dreaman EPA-approved insect repellent that tricks insects away from plants, trees and vines and contains only garlic oil and water.

Normally two sprayings of Garlic Barrier in a growing season will keep plants insect-free. (In the spring you do have to make sure you spray after a plant has been fertilized, because bees will stay away as well!)

You dilute Garlic Barrier concentrate with 10 parts tap water. Using a household spray bottle, mist the leaves of the plants you want to protect. Any odor disappears within a few minutes. After about 24 hours, plants begin to repel insects -- with no aftertaste on fruits or vegetables.

Once insects have taken up residence on your plants, GarliBarrier probably won't budge them, so it's important to spray before they're infested.

Garlic Barrier may not be in your garden store yet because it's only recently been approved by the Maryland State Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency. But you can order it from the local distributor, Rodwill International Inc., by calling (410) 882-5510. Retail cost of a pint bottle of concentrate is $10.95.

No one could call Italian designer Gianni Versace's dresses and scarves boring, with their vibrant colors and elaborate motifs. Even if you love the look -- and even if you can afford the clothes -- they're so showy you may not think you can wear them.

But you can surround yourself with Gianni Versace dinnerwareHe's created four designs for Rosenthal China, drawing from Greek, Chinese and French motifs, all of which are flamboyant and very colorful. "Le Roi Soleil," for instance, has a central image of the Sun King, Louis XIV, elaborated with cherubs, flowers, fruit, festoons, griffins, scrollwork, courtiers and court dancers. Each piece in a particular service is different from the others. (The salad plate's design doesn't look like the dinner plate's, for instance.)

In the Baltimore area, Versace china is sold exclusively aCreative Specialties in Pikesville. An individual dinner plate costs $69; a five-piece place setting is $295.

Not everyone can afford an interior designer to redecorate -- or wants to. But practically everyone can enjoy being a do-it-yourselfer with Simplicity's "Simply the Best Home Decorating Book," published this month by Simon & Schuster.

The spiral-bound paperback, which sells for $20, is aencyclopedia of design ideas, projects and how-to sewing instructions. The authors are fully aware that readers are likely to be short of time and on tight budgets; the book is planned accordingly.

You start with decorating theory -- understanding what makes a room work. Once you've learned basic sewing techniques, you'll find plenty of projects, both simple and complex, such as window treatments, bed coverings, slipcovers and decorative accessories. There are lots of illustrations, plus a 16-page section of color photographs.

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